1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy investigation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in bipolar disorder patients

Paolo Brambilla, Jeffrey A. Stanley, Mark A. Nicoletti, Roberto B. Sassi, Alan G. Mallinger, Ellen Frank, David Kupfer, Matcheri S. Keshavan, Jair C. Soares

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies (MRS) reported abnormally low levels of N-acetylaspartate (NAA, a marker of neuronal integrity) in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of adult bipolar patients, suggesting possible neuronal dysfunction. Furthermore, recent MRS reports suggested possible lithium-induced increase in NAA levels in bipolar patients. We examined with in vivo 1H MRS NAA levels in the DLPFC of adult bipolar patients. Methods: Ten DSM-IV bipolar disorder patients (6 lithium-treated, 4 drug-free) and 32 healthy controls underwent a short echo-time 1H MRS session, which localized an 8 cm3 single-voxel in the left DLPFC using a STEAM sequence. Results: No significant differences between the two groups were found for NAA, choline-containing molecules (GPC+PC), or phosphocreatine plus creatine (PCr+Cr) (Student t-test, p>0.05). Nonetheless, NAA/PCr+Cr ratios were significantly increased in lithium-treated bipolar subjects compared to unmedicated patients and healthy controls (Mann-Whitney U-test, p1H MRS studies should further examine NAA levels in prefrontal cortex regions in untreated bipolar patients before and after mood stabilizing treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61-67
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume86
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2005

Keywords

  • Affective disorder
  • Lithium
  • Mood disorder
  • NAA
  • Neuroimaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Neurology
  • Psychology(all)

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