3p microsatellite alterations in exhaled breath condensate from patients with non-small cell lung cancer

Giovanna Elisiana Carpagnano, Maria Pia Foschino-Barbaro, Giuseppina Mulé, Onofrio Resta, Stefania Tommasi, Anita Mangia, Francesco Carpagnano, Gaetano Stea, Antonia Susca, Giuseppe Di Gioia, Mario De Lena, Angelo Paradiso

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The still-high mortality for lung cancer urgently requires the availability of new, noninvasive diagnostic tools for use in early diagnosis and screening programs. Recently, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) has been proposed as a useful tool to obtain biological information on lung cancer disease. This study provides, for the first time, evidence that DNA alterations already described in lung cancer are detectable in EBC from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and in healthy subjects. Thirty patients with histologic evidence of NSCLC and 20 healthy subjects were enrolled in the present study. All subjects had allelotyping analysis of DNA from EBC (EBC-DNA) and from whole blood (WB-DNA) of a selected panel of five microsatellites (D3S2338, D3S1266, D3S1300, D3S1304, D3S1289) located in chromosomal region 3p. Results from healthy subjects and subjects with cancer, and from EBC and WB, were compared. In addition, the relationships with smoking habit and clinicopathologic tumor features were considered. Microsatellite alterations (MAs) were found in 53% of EBC-DNA and in 10% of WB-DNA loci investigated in patients with NSCLC (p <10-6); conversely, MAs were present only in 13% of EBC-DNA and in 2% of WB-DNA informative loci in healthy subjects. In patients with NSCLC, a direct association between number of MAs detected in EBC-DNA and tobacco consumption was observed. We conclude that EBC-DNA is highly sensitive in detecting MA information unique to patients with lung cancer. Furthermore, MA information seems to be directly related with tobacco consumption, and is potentially applicable to screening and early diagnostic programs for patients with NSCLC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)738-744
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume172
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 15 2005

Fingerprint

Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Microsatellite Repeats
DNA
Lung Neoplasms
Healthy Volunteers
Tobacco Use
Lung Diseases
Habits
Early Diagnosis
Neoplasms
Smoking
Mortality

Keywords

  • Breath condensate
  • DNA
  • Microsatellite
  • Non-small cell lung cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

3p microsatellite alterations in exhaled breath condensate from patients with non-small cell lung cancer. / Carpagnano, Giovanna Elisiana; Foschino-Barbaro, Maria Pia; Mulé, Giuseppina; Resta, Onofrio; Tommasi, Stefania; Mangia, Anita; Carpagnano, Francesco; Stea, Gaetano; Susca, Antonia; Di Gioia, Giuseppe; De Lena, Mario; Paradiso, Angelo.

In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 172, No. 6, 15.09.2005, p. 738-744.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carpagnano, Giovanna Elisiana ; Foschino-Barbaro, Maria Pia ; Mulé, Giuseppina ; Resta, Onofrio ; Tommasi, Stefania ; Mangia, Anita ; Carpagnano, Francesco ; Stea, Gaetano ; Susca, Antonia ; Di Gioia, Giuseppe ; De Lena, Mario ; Paradiso, Angelo. / 3p microsatellite alterations in exhaled breath condensate from patients with non-small cell lung cancer. In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 2005 ; Vol. 172, No. 6. pp. 738-744.
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AU - Carpagnano, Giovanna Elisiana

AU - Foschino-Barbaro, Maria Pia

AU - Mulé, Giuseppina

AU - Resta, Onofrio

AU - Tommasi, Stefania

AU - Mangia, Anita

AU - Carpagnano, Francesco

AU - Stea, Gaetano

AU - Susca, Antonia

AU - Di Gioia, Giuseppe

AU - De Lena, Mario

AU - Paradiso, Angelo

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N2 - The still-high mortality for lung cancer urgently requires the availability of new, noninvasive diagnostic tools for use in early diagnosis and screening programs. Recently, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) has been proposed as a useful tool to obtain biological information on lung cancer disease. This study provides, for the first time, evidence that DNA alterations already described in lung cancer are detectable in EBC from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and in healthy subjects. Thirty patients with histologic evidence of NSCLC and 20 healthy subjects were enrolled in the present study. All subjects had allelotyping analysis of DNA from EBC (EBC-DNA) and from whole blood (WB-DNA) of a selected panel of five microsatellites (D3S2338, D3S1266, D3S1300, D3S1304, D3S1289) located in chromosomal region 3p. Results from healthy subjects and subjects with cancer, and from EBC and WB, were compared. In addition, the relationships with smoking habit and clinicopathologic tumor features were considered. Microsatellite alterations (MAs) were found in 53% of EBC-DNA and in 10% of WB-DNA loci investigated in patients with NSCLC (p <10-6); conversely, MAs were present only in 13% of EBC-DNA and in 2% of WB-DNA informative loci in healthy subjects. In patients with NSCLC, a direct association between number of MAs detected in EBC-DNA and tobacco consumption was observed. We conclude that EBC-DNA is highly sensitive in detecting MA information unique to patients with lung cancer. Furthermore, MA information seems to be directly related with tobacco consumption, and is potentially applicable to screening and early diagnostic programs for patients with NSCLC.

AB - The still-high mortality for lung cancer urgently requires the availability of new, noninvasive diagnostic tools for use in early diagnosis and screening programs. Recently, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) has been proposed as a useful tool to obtain biological information on lung cancer disease. This study provides, for the first time, evidence that DNA alterations already described in lung cancer are detectable in EBC from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and in healthy subjects. Thirty patients with histologic evidence of NSCLC and 20 healthy subjects were enrolled in the present study. All subjects had allelotyping analysis of DNA from EBC (EBC-DNA) and from whole blood (WB-DNA) of a selected panel of five microsatellites (D3S2338, D3S1266, D3S1300, D3S1304, D3S1289) located in chromosomal region 3p. Results from healthy subjects and subjects with cancer, and from EBC and WB, were compared. In addition, the relationships with smoking habit and clinicopathologic tumor features were considered. Microsatellite alterations (MAs) were found in 53% of EBC-DNA and in 10% of WB-DNA loci investigated in patients with NSCLC (p <10-6); conversely, MAs were present only in 13% of EBC-DNA and in 2% of WB-DNA informative loci in healthy subjects. In patients with NSCLC, a direct association between number of MAs detected in EBC-DNA and tobacco consumption was observed. We conclude that EBC-DNA is highly sensitive in detecting MA information unique to patients with lung cancer. Furthermore, MA information seems to be directly related with tobacco consumption, and is potentially applicable to screening and early diagnostic programs for patients with NSCLC.

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