3p14.1 de novo microdeletion involving the FOXP1 gene in an adult patient with autism, severe speech delay and deficit of motor coordination

Orazio Palumbo, Leonardo D'Agruma, Adelaide Franca Minenna, Pietro Palumbo, Raffaella Stallone, Teresa Palladino, Leopoldo Zelante, Massimo Carella

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Interstitial deletion of chromosome region 3p14.1, including FOXP1 gene, is relatively rare and, until recently, there were no strong evidences to support the hypothesis that this microdeletion could play a role in the etiology of genomic disorders. Here, we report on an adult patient with a recognizable phenotype of autism, severe speech delay, deficit of motor coordination and typical dysmorphic features. Analysis of a dense whole genome single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array showed a 1. Mb interstitial deletion of chromosome region 3p14.1 including the entire coding region of FOXP1 (MIM 605515) gene. In order to study the parental origin of the deletion, we analyzed selected SNPs in the deleted area in the proband and his parents showing Mendelian incompatibilities suggesting a de novo deletion on the chromosome of paternal origin. Despite the frequency of this genomic alteration has not been estimated, our patient confirm the hypothesis that microdeletion of 3p14.1 seems to be a rare cause of cognitive disorders and that haploinsufficiency of FOXP1 may play a role in neurological and language deficits in patients carrying a 3p14.1 deletion. Finally, our patient is also important because useful to further delineate the clinical spectrum secondary to the 3p14.1 microdeletions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)107-113
Number of pages7
JournalGene
Volume516
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2013

Keywords

  • 3p14.1
  • FOXP1 deletion
  • SNP-arrays

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of '3p14.1 de novo microdeletion involving the FOXP1 gene in an adult patient with autism, severe speech delay and deficit of motor coordination'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this