7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Neurology

E. Nobile-Orazio, R. A. Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy has been used and studied as a treatment for a variety of neurological conditions for decades. In some of these disorders Ig therapy has a significant role as a first-line treatment. This session explores the use of Ig therapy in immune-mediated peripheral neuropathies and various central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Informative practice points relating to the management and treatment of these diseases are discussed. Potential future neurological indications for Ig therapy, as well as data on efficacy and possible mechanisms of action, are also presented. In peripheral immune-mediated neuropathies, data show good response rates to Ig therapy and it is often used as a first-line treatment. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIg) are both well tolerated, but dose and dosing frequency should be based on individual clinical responses. In Alzheimer's disease, although clinical data show no significant differences between IVIg and placebo, biomarker studies indicate that plasma-derived antibodies may be involved in clearance of amyloid aggregates from the brain. Data suggest that the use of high IVIg doses in early-stage Alzheimer's treatment may warrant further investigation. Ig therapy is considered a valuable option for autoimmune encephalitis, an antibody-mediated CNS disease. Combination treatment with IVIg and corticosteroids shows promising results and is proposed as a first-line treatment in these disorders. Until recently, very little was understood about the pathogenesis of chronic pain disorders. Data now indicate that perpetuation of the pain response may be underpinned by central immune activation. Some data suggest that Ig therapy may mitigate this effect, with good response rates in a number of studies, but these data need confirmation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)22-24
Number of pages3
JournalClinical and Experimental Immunology
Volume178
Issue numberS1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2014

Fingerprint

Passive Immunization
Neurology
Immunoglobulins
Intravenous Immunoglobulins
Central Nervous System Diseases
Therapeutics
Somatoform Disorders
Antibodies
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Disease Management
Amyloid
Chronic Pain
Alzheimer Disease
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Biomarkers
Placebos
Pain
Brain

Keywords

  • Biomarker
  • Immunoglobulin
  • Intravenous immunoglobulin
  • Neurological disorders
  • Subcutaneous immunoglobulin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

7th International Immunoglobulin Conference : Neurology. / Nobile-Orazio, E.; Lewis, R. A.

In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, Vol. 178, No. S1, 01.12.2014, p. 22-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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