800 mg of cimetidine versus 300 mg of ranitidine at bedtime in the short-term treatment of duodenal ulcer: A cost/benefit study

G. Leandro, G. Battaglia, P. Dotto, G. Del Favero, A. Martin, F. Vianello, B. Germana, S. A. Grassi, F. Di Mario

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cimetidine 800 mg was compared with ranitidine 300 mg in single nighttime doses in the treatment of active duodenal ulcer. One hundred patients entered the study, 50 in each treatment group. The two treatment groups were comparable regarding the common clinical and biochemical parameters. Three patients dropped out: two in the cimetidine group and one in the ranitidine group. After six and 12 weeks of treatment 72% and 92% of patients, respectively, were healed in the cimetidine group, as opposed to 96% and 98% in the ranitidine group. The difference was statistically significant at the sixth week but not at the 12th week. No differences were found in the symptomatic improvement between the two drugs. Based on our results, we calculated that the 50 patients treated with ranitidine for six weeks spent a total of $945 more for therapy than the 50 cimetidine-treated patients. The choice of one drug rather than another should, in our opinion, be made on the basis of a cost/benefit evaluation, according to the current retail prices.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)412-416
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Therapeutic Research
Volume50
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1991

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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    Leandro, G., Battaglia, G., Dotto, P., Del Favero, G., Martin, A., Vianello, F., Germana, B., Grassi, S. A., & Di Mario, F. (1991). 800 mg of cimetidine versus 300 mg of ranitidine at bedtime in the short-term treatment of duodenal ulcer: A cost/benefit study. Current Therapeutic Research, 50(3), 412-416.