A basic diagnostic headache diary (BDHD) is well accepted and useful in the diagnosis of headache. A multicentre European and Latin American study

R. Jensen, C. Tassorelli, P. Rossi, M. Allena, V. Osipova, T. J. Steiner, G. Sandrini, J. Olesen, G. Nappi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aims: We tested the usability and usefulness of the basic diagnostic headache diary (BDHD) for the diagnosis of migraine, tension-type headache and medication-overuse headache in European and Latin American countries.Methods: Patients were subdivided into two groups according to a 1:1 randomization list. Those in group 1 were sent the BDHD before their first visit to the headache centre and asked to complete it for at least 1 month. Those in group 2 made their first visit to the headache centre without receiving the BDHD.Results: A total of 626 patients from nine countries and 16 centres completed the study. The BDHD entries were complete in 97.5% of cases. BDHD information and clinical interview were, when taken together, considered complete for diagnosis in 97.7% of cases in group 1 whereas the information obtained by clinical interview alone in group 2 was considered complete in only 86.8% of cases (p <0.001). The median number of diagnoses per patient in group 1 was significantly higher than in group 2 (p = 0.04). The BDHD was very well accepted by both patients and doctors.Conclusions: It is concluded that the BDHD is a useful tool in the diagnostic assessment of the most frequent and disabling forms of primary headache and in headache management.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1549-1560
Number of pages12
JournalCephalalgia
Volume31
Issue number15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2011

Keywords

  • diagnostic support
  • Diary
  • medication-overuse headache
  • migraine
  • tension-type

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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