A brain-computer interface as input channel for a standard assistive technology software

Claudia Zickler, Angela Riccio, Francesco Leotta, Sandra Hillian-Tress, Sebastian Halder, Elisa Holz, Pit Staiger-Sal̈zer, Evert Jan Hoogerwerf, Lorenzo Desideri, Donatella Mattia, Andrea Kub̈ler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recently brain-computer interface (BCI) control was integrated into the commercial assistive technology product QualiWORLD (QualiLife Inc., Paradiso-Lugano, CH). Usability of the first prototype was evaluated in terms of effectiveness (accuracy), efficiency (information transfer rate and subjective workload/NASA Task Load Index) and user satisfaction (Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology, QUEST 2.0) by four end-users with severe disabilities. Three assistive technology experts evaluated the device from a third person perspective. The results revealed high performance levels in communication and internet tasks. Users and assistive technology experts were quite satisfied with the device. However, none could imagine using the device in daily life without improvements. Main obstacles were the EEG-cap and low speed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)236-244
Number of pages9
JournalClinical EEG and Neuroscience
Volume42
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2011

Fingerprint

Brain-Computer Interfaces
Self-Help Devices
Software
Equipment and Supplies
United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Quebec
Workload
Internet
Electroencephalography
Communication

Keywords

  • Assistive technology
  • Brain-computer interface
  • Electroencephalography
  • Information and communication technology
  • P300 event-related potential
  • Usability
  • Users with disabilities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Zickler, C., Riccio, A., Leotta, F., Hillian-Tress, S., Halder, S., Holz, E., ... Kub̈ler, A. (2011). A brain-computer interface as input channel for a standard assistive technology software. Clinical EEG and Neuroscience, 42(4), 236-244.

A brain-computer interface as input channel for a standard assistive technology software. / Zickler, Claudia; Riccio, Angela; Leotta, Francesco; Hillian-Tress, Sandra; Halder, Sebastian; Holz, Elisa; Staiger-Sal̈zer, Pit; Hoogerwerf, Evert Jan; Desideri, Lorenzo; Mattia, Donatella; Kub̈ler, Andrea.

In: Clinical EEG and Neuroscience, Vol. 42, No. 4, 10.2011, p. 236-244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zickler, C, Riccio, A, Leotta, F, Hillian-Tress, S, Halder, S, Holz, E, Staiger-Sal̈zer, P, Hoogerwerf, EJ, Desideri, L, Mattia, D & Kub̈ler, A 2011, 'A brain-computer interface as input channel for a standard assistive technology software', Clinical EEG and Neuroscience, vol. 42, no. 4, pp. 236-244.
Zickler C, Riccio A, Leotta F, Hillian-Tress S, Halder S, Holz E et al. A brain-computer interface as input channel for a standard assistive technology software. Clinical EEG and Neuroscience. 2011 Oct;42(4):236-244.
Zickler, Claudia ; Riccio, Angela ; Leotta, Francesco ; Hillian-Tress, Sandra ; Halder, Sebastian ; Holz, Elisa ; Staiger-Sal̈zer, Pit ; Hoogerwerf, Evert Jan ; Desideri, Lorenzo ; Mattia, Donatella ; Kub̈ler, Andrea. / A brain-computer interface as input channel for a standard assistive technology software. In: Clinical EEG and Neuroscience. 2011 ; Vol. 42, No. 4. pp. 236-244.
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