A case of human polyomavirus BK infection in a patient affected by late stage prostate cancer: Could viral infection be correlated with cancer progression?

D. Fioriti, G. Russo, M. Mischitelli, E. Anzivino, A. Bellizzi, F. Di Monaco, F. Di Silverio, A. Giordano, F. Chiarini, Valeria Pietropaolo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The basic molecular mechanisms regulating prostate cancer (PCA) development and progression are very poorly understood. Different tumor suppressor genes are implicated in PCA. In particular, since the mutation rate of the p53 gene is also low, researchers have speculated that an infectious agent might play an important role in PCA. Polyomaviruses are candidates for this agent. We selected a patient with a diagnosis of PCA and underwent radical prostatectomy, to investigate the presence of polyomavirus BK (BKV) sequences (urine and neoplastic tissues) and the mutation pattern of p53 gene. The results obtained showed the presence of BKV DNA and of p53 gene mutations in exons 6, 8 and 9. We speculate that BKV might contribute to cellular transformation process, triggered possibly by p53 gene mutations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)405-411
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Immunopathology and Pharmacology
Volume20
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2007

Keywords

  • Human polyomavirus BK
  • p53 gene mutations
  • Polymerase chain reaction
  • Prostate cancer
  • Quantitative polymerase chain reaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

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    Fioriti, D., Russo, G., Mischitelli, M., Anzivino, E., Bellizzi, A., Di Monaco, F., Di Silverio, F., Giordano, A., Chiarini, F., & Pietropaolo, V. (2007). A case of human polyomavirus BK infection in a patient affected by late stage prostate cancer: Could viral infection be correlated with cancer progression? International Journal of Immunopathology and Pharmacology, 20(2), 405-411.