A comparison of different strategies used to invite subjects with a positive faecal occult blood test to a colonoscopy assessment. A randomised controlled trial in population-based screening programmes

Manuel Zorzi, Paolo Giorgi Rossi, Carla Cogo, Fabio Falcini, Daniela Giorgi, Grazia Grazzini, Loretta Mariotti, Vincenzo Matarese, Fabio Soppelsa, Carlo Senore, Antonio Ferro, Rosanna Mel, Anna Tison, Sabrina Di Camillo, Bastianello Germanà, Marco Bisello, Stefano Lazzaro, Luca Maria Antoniello, Sandra Bertazzo, Meris GennaroLucio Trevisani, Viviana Cifalà, Carolina Degl'Innocenti, Manola Migliori, Rosanna Ciacci, Americo Colamartini, Orietta Giuliani, Rosa Vattiato, Monica Palumbo, Alessandra Barca, Diego Baiocchi, Francesco Quadrino, Paola Bellardini, Alberto Picchi, Giovanni Finucci, Sergio Coccioli, Basilio Ubaldo Passamonti, Morena Malaspina, Beatrice Tintori, Valentina D'Angelo, Marco Silvani, Giorgia Fiorina, Arianna Capuano, Nereo Segnan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this parallel randomised controlled trial was to compare compliance with different modalities used to invite patients with a positive immunochemical faecal occult blood test (FIT. +) for a total colonoscopy (TC). Method: FIT. + patients from nine Italian colorectal cancer screening programmes were randomised to be invited for a TC initially by mail or by phone and, for non-compliers, to be recalled by mail, for counselling with a general practitioner, or to meet with a specialist screening practitioner (nurse or healthcare assistant). Results: In all, 3777 patients were randomised to different invitation strategies. Compliance with an initial invitation by mail and by phone was similar (86.0% vs. 84.0%, relative risk - RR: 1.02; 95%CI 0.97-1.08). Among non-responders to the initial invitation, compliance with a recall by appointment with a specialist practitioner was 50.4%, significantly higher than with a mail recall (38.1%; RR:1.33; 95%CI 1.01-1.76) or with a face-to-face counselling with the GP (30.8%; RR:1.45;95%CI 1.14-1.87). Conclusion: Compliance with an initial invitation for a TC by mail and by phone was similar. A personal meeting with a specialist screening practitioner was associated with the highest compliance among non-compliers with initial invitations, while the involvement of GPs in this particular activity seemed less effective.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)70-76
Number of pages7
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume65
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Colorectal cancer screening
  • Compliance with colonoscopy
  • Faecal occult blood test

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology
  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A comparison of different strategies used to invite subjects with a positive faecal occult blood test to a colonoscopy assessment. A randomised controlled trial in population-based screening programmes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this