A Comparison of Shallow and Deep Learning Methods for Predicting Cognitive Performance of Stroke Patients From MRI Lesion Images

Sucheta Chauhan, Lovekesh Vig, Michele De Filippo De Grazia, Maurizio Corbetta, Shandar Ahmad, Marco Zorzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Stroke causes behavioral deficits in multiple cognitive domains and there is a growing interest in predicting patient performance from neuroimaging data using machine learning techniques. Here, we investigated a deep learning approach based on convolutional neural networks (CNNs) for predicting the severity of language disorder from 3D lesion images from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a heterogeneous sample of stroke patients. CNN performance was compared to that of conventional (shallow) machine learning methods, including ridge regression (RR) on the images’ principal components and support vector regression. We also devised a hybrid method based on re-using CNN’s high-level features as additional input to the RR model. Predictive accuracy of the four different methods was further investigated in relation to the size of the training set and the level of redundancy across lesion images in the dataset, which was evaluated in terms of location and topological properties of the lesions. The Hybrid model achieved the best performance in most cases, thereby suggesting that the high-level features extracted by CNNs are complementary to principal component analysis features and improve the model’s predictive accuracy. Moreover, our analyses indicate that both the size of training data and image redundancy are critical factors in determining the accuracy of a computational model in predicting behavioral outcome from the structural brain imaging data of stroke patients.

Original languageEnglish
Article number53
JournalFrontiers in Neuroinformatics
Volume13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 31 2019

Keywords

  • brain lesion
  • cognitive deficit
  • deep learning
  • machine learning
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications

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