A controlled study of potential risk factors preceding exacerbation in multiple sclerosis

C. Gasperini, M. G. Grasso, M. Fiorelli, E. Millefiorini, S. Morino, A. Anzini, A. Colleluori, M. Salvetti, C. Buttinelli, C. Pozzilli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A wide variety of potential risk factors for acute exacerbations in multiple sclerosis were evaluated in a one year case-control study. Eighty nine consecutive patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis and relapsing remitting course presenting with a relapse between January and December 1992 were compared with patients matched for age, sex, and degree of disability, who did not experience clinical exacerbations during the same period. Only potential risk factors occurring in the three months preceding the interview were considered patients. Relapsing patients reported no significant increase in the frequency of any risk factor in the three month period before exacerbation compared with the control group. These results suggest that most relapses are not preceded by the conditions commonly considered as risk factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)303-305
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry
Volume59
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1995

Keywords

  • Exacerbation
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

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  • Cite this

    Gasperini, C., Grasso, M. G., Fiorelli, M., Millefiorini, E., Morino, S., Anzini, A., Colleluori, A., Salvetti, M., Buttinelli, C., & Pozzilli, C. (1995). A controlled study of potential risk factors preceding exacerbation in multiple sclerosis. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 59(3), 303-305. https://doi.org/10.1136/jnnp.59.3.303