A follow-up study of patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome in the period 1966-2002: Effects of surgical and medical treatments on long-term survival

Maurizio Quatrini, Laura Castoldi, Giorgio Rossi, Bruno M. Cesana, Maddalena Peracchi, Maria Teresa Bardella

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim: To evaluate the clinical history of a series of patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) in the period 1966 to 2002, before and after the introduction of the current antisecretive H2 receptor antagonists and proton pump inhibitors into clinical practice. Patients and Methods: The study involved 18 ZES patients (9 males; mean age, 43 years; range, 12-70 years), 8 with Type 1 multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN-1), diagnosed on the basis of standard criteria. We considered the type, number and effectiveness of surgical interventions before and after appropriate treatment, the localization of the gastrinoma, the presence of associated diseases, the causes of death, and the duration of survival. Results: Total gastrectomy (but not antrectomy and vagotomy) and full compliance to antisecretory treatment reduced the number of operations from 29 to 9. One patient was cured (5.5%), whereas relapsing gastrinomas occurred in 4 patients and associated diseases or complications in ten. Death was related to ZES in 5 patients and to other causes in 4. Conclusions: Curing gastrinoma or appropriately inhibiting gastric acid hypersecretion in ZES patients prevent death and favors long-term survival, regardless of gastrin levels and the size or number of tumors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)376-380
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Volume39
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2005

Keywords

  • Associated diseases
  • Survival
  • Treatment
  • Zollinger-Ellison syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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