A gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist versus a low-dose oral contraceptive for pelvic pain associated with endometriosis

P. Vercellini, L. Trespidi, A. Colombo, N. Vendola, M. Marchini, P. G. Crosignani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of goserelin versus a low-dose cyclic oral contraceptive (OC) in improving pelvic pain in women with endometriosis and to compare recurrence of symptoms during follow-up. Design: Open-label, randomized trial. Setting: University hospital endometriosis center. Patients: Fifty-seven women with moderate or severe pelvic pain and laparoscopically diagnosed endometriosis. Interventions: Six-month treatment with goserelin depot (n = 29) or a low-dose cyclic OC (n = 28) followed by 6- month follow-up. Main Outcome Measures: Variation in severity of symptoms during treatment and at the end of follow-up as shown by a linear analog scale and a verbal rating scale. Results: At 6 months of treatment, a significant reduction in deep dyspareunia was observed in both groups, with goserelin superior to the OC at linear analog scale assessment. Nonmenstrual pain was diminished on both scales without differences between treatments. Women taking the OC experienced a significant reduction in dysmenorrhea. At the end of follow-up, symptoms reappeared without differences in severity between the groups. Conclusions: Low-dose cyclic OCs may be a valuable alternative for the treatment of dysmenorrhea and nonmenstrual pain associated with endometriosis. Symptoms recurred in most subjects 6 months after drug withdrawal.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)75-79
Number of pages5
JournalFertility and Sterility
Volume60
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1993

Keywords

  • dysmenorrhea
  • dyspareunia
  • Endometriosis
  • GnRH agonists
  • oral contraceptives
  • pelvic pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

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