A jigsaw-puzzle imagery task for assessing active visuospatial processes in old and young people

John T E Richardson, Tomaso Vecchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies have suggested a theoretical distinction between active elaboration and passive storage in visuospatial working memory, but research with older adults has failed to demonstrate a differential preservation of these two abilities. The results are controversial, and the investigation of the active component has been inhibited by the absence of any appropriate experimental procedures. A new task was developed involving the mental reconstruction of pictures of objects from fragmented pieces, and this provides a useful procedure for exploring active visuospatial processing. Significant differences in terms of both correctness and response latency were obtained between young and older adults and between younger old and older old adults. Performance also varied with visual complexity, mental rotation, and processing load. It is concluded that this ecologically relevant procedure constitutes a very powerful, sensitive, and reliable tool for identifying individual differences in visuospatial working memory.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-82
Number of pages14
JournalBehavior Research Methods, Instruments, and Computers
Volume34
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2002

Fingerprint

Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Short-Term Memory
Aptitude
Individuality
Reaction Time
Young Adult
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

A jigsaw-puzzle imagery task for assessing active visuospatial processes in old and young people. / Richardson, John T E; Vecchi, Tomaso.

In: Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, and Computers, Vol. 34, No. 1, 02.2002, p. 69-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{50d84d8192d04eaea381216487d4a529,
title = "A jigsaw-puzzle imagery task for assessing active visuospatial processes in old and young people",
abstract = "Recent studies have suggested a theoretical distinction between active elaboration and passive storage in visuospatial working memory, but research with older adults has failed to demonstrate a differential preservation of these two abilities. The results are controversial, and the investigation of the active component has been inhibited by the absence of any appropriate experimental procedures. A new task was developed involving the mental reconstruction of pictures of objects from fragmented pieces, and this provides a useful procedure for exploring active visuospatial processing. Significant differences in terms of both correctness and response latency were obtained between young and older adults and between younger old and older old adults. Performance also varied with visual complexity, mental rotation, and processing load. It is concluded that this ecologically relevant procedure constitutes a very powerful, sensitive, and reliable tool for identifying individual differences in visuospatial working memory.",
author = "Richardson, {John T E} and Tomaso Vecchi",
year = "2002",
month = "2",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "69--82",
journal = "Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, and Computers",
issn = "0743-3808",
publisher = "Psychonomic Society Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A jigsaw-puzzle imagery task for assessing active visuospatial processes in old and young people

AU - Richardson, John T E

AU - Vecchi, Tomaso

PY - 2002/2

Y1 - 2002/2

N2 - Recent studies have suggested a theoretical distinction between active elaboration and passive storage in visuospatial working memory, but research with older adults has failed to demonstrate a differential preservation of these two abilities. The results are controversial, and the investigation of the active component has been inhibited by the absence of any appropriate experimental procedures. A new task was developed involving the mental reconstruction of pictures of objects from fragmented pieces, and this provides a useful procedure for exploring active visuospatial processing. Significant differences in terms of both correctness and response latency were obtained between young and older adults and between younger old and older old adults. Performance also varied with visual complexity, mental rotation, and processing load. It is concluded that this ecologically relevant procedure constitutes a very powerful, sensitive, and reliable tool for identifying individual differences in visuospatial working memory.

AB - Recent studies have suggested a theoretical distinction between active elaboration and passive storage in visuospatial working memory, but research with older adults has failed to demonstrate a differential preservation of these two abilities. The results are controversial, and the investigation of the active component has been inhibited by the absence of any appropriate experimental procedures. A new task was developed involving the mental reconstruction of pictures of objects from fragmented pieces, and this provides a useful procedure for exploring active visuospatial processing. Significant differences in terms of both correctness and response latency were obtained between young and older adults and between younger old and older old adults. Performance also varied with visual complexity, mental rotation, and processing load. It is concluded that this ecologically relevant procedure constitutes a very powerful, sensitive, and reliable tool for identifying individual differences in visuospatial working memory.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036481788&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036481788&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 69

EP - 82

JO - Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, and Computers

JF - Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, and Computers

SN - 0743-3808

IS - 1

ER -