A life course approach to explore the biological embedding of socioeconomic position and social mobility through circulating inflammatory markers

Raphaële Castagné, Cyrille Delpierre, Michelle Kelly-Irving, Gianluca Campanella, Florence Guida, Vittorio Krogh, Domenico Palli, Salvatore Panico, Carlotta Sacerdote, Rosario Tumino, Soterios Kyrtopoulos, Fatemeh Saberi Hosnijeh, Thierry Lang, Roel Vermeulen, Paolo Vineis, Silvia Stringhini, Marc Chadeau-Hyam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Lower socioeconomic position (SEP) has consistently been associated with poorer health. To explore potential biological embedding and the consequences of SEP experiences from early life to adulthood, we investigate how SEP indicators at different points across the life course may be related to a combination of 28 inflammation markers. Using blood-derived inflammation profiles measured by a multiplex array in 268 participants from the Italian component of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort, we evaluate the association between early life, young adulthood and later adulthood SEP with each inflammatory markers separately, or by combining them into an inflammatory score. We identified an increased inflammatory burden in participants whose father had a manual occupation, through increased plasma levels of CSF3 (G-CSF; β = 0.29; P = 0.002), and an increased inflammatory score (β = 1.96; P = 0.029). Social mobility was subsequently modelled by the interaction between father's occupation and the highest household occupation, revealing a significant difference between "stable Non-manual" profiles over the life course versus "Manual to Nonmanual" profiles (β = 2.38, P = 0.023). Low SEP in childhood is associated with modest increase in adult inflammatory burden; however, the analysis of social mobility suggests a stronger effect of an upward social mobility over the life course.

Original languageEnglish
Article number25170
JournalScientific Reports
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 27 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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