A look to the future: Prediction, prevention, and cure including islet transplantation and stem cell therapy

Anna Casu, Massimo Trucco, Massimo Pietropaolo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is common agreement indicating that the occurrence of multiple antibodies against islet autoantigens serves as a surrogate marker of disease in primary or secondary intervention strategies aimed at halting the disease process. To date, a number of intervention strategies are in the pipeline and some of them seem promising. These therapies include anti-CD3 humanized monoclonal antibody; antilymphocyte serum; and a number of antigen-specific therapies, such as oral insulin. The DPT-1 has recently performed a subgroup analysis suggesting potential benefit of oral insulin for relatives with high insulin autoantibody titers. A trial conducted by Neurocrine using an altered insulin peptide ligand of insulin B:9-23 is currently underway in humans in which the peptide is delivered without the use of an adjuvant or other immunomodulation. Many of these antigen-specific therapies for T1DM and other autoimmune diseases have not been approved. There is both a growing effort and a large opportunity for exploring new specific strategies alone or in combination with immunomodulation. It is possible that gene-engineered cell therapeutics if combined with immunotherapy may effectively replace the pancreatic β-cell loss in T1DM. The hope to induce pancreatic islet regeneration and, ultimately, to transplant insulin-producing cells with a sustained secretagogue capacity propels confidence that the cure of T1DM is within reach.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1779-1804
Number of pages26
JournalPediatric Clinics of North America
Volume52
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2005

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Islets of Langerhans Transplantation
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Islets of Langerhans
Stem Cells
Insulin
Immunomodulation
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
Antigens
Antilymphocyte Serum
Autoantigens
Therapeutics
Autoantibodies
Immunotherapy
Autoimmune Diseases
Regeneration
Biomarkers
Ligands
Transplants
Peptides
Antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

A look to the future : Prediction, prevention, and cure including islet transplantation and stem cell therapy. / Casu, Anna; Trucco, Massimo; Pietropaolo, Massimo.

In: Pediatric Clinics of North America, Vol. 52, No. 6, 12.2005, p. 1779-1804.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Casu, Anna ; Trucco, Massimo ; Pietropaolo, Massimo. / A look to the future : Prediction, prevention, and cure including islet transplantation and stem cell therapy. In: Pediatric Clinics of North America. 2005 ; Vol. 52, No. 6. pp. 1779-1804.
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