A mixture of bacterial mechanical lysates is more efficient than single strain lysate and of bacterial-derived soluble products for the induction of an activating phenotype in human dendritic cells

Barbara Morandi, Alessia Agazzi, Antonella D'Agostino, Francesca Antonini, Gregorio Costa, Federica Sabatini, Guido Ferlazzo, Giovanni Melioli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Dendritic cells (DCs), following an optimal maturation, are able to drive an efficient immune-response. For this, both co-stimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86), activation molecules (CD83) and peptide presenting molecules (HLA) are over-expressed. The in vitro treatment of immature DC with fragments of bacterial strains, obtained by using a mechanical lysis as well as with bacterial-derived molecules (such as lipopolysaccharide and protido-glycan), induced the maturation of DCs and the secretion of a panel of cytokines and chemokines. Of note, ex vivo treated circulating DCs and plasmacytoid DCs were also activated by these bacterial bodies. However, while the particulate fraction of single bacterial strains or soluble bacterial-derived molecules induced a sub-optimal maturation (as evaluated by the expression of an activating phenotype on DCs and the amount of cytokine secretion), the addition of the mixture of the particulate fractions of the different bacterial strains was able to mediate an optimal maturation. These results were also confirmed by using the secretion of both cytokines and chemokines as markers of DC activation. All these findings suggest that the particulate fraction of bacterial lysate mixtures, because of their ability to interact with different surface structures, might be exploited not only as an immunogen, but also as an adjuvant treatment to boost an immune-response to poorly "antigenic" proteins, such as cancer antigens or allergens.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)86-91
Number of pages6
JournalImmunology Letters
Volume138
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

Keywords

  • Bacterial lysates
  • Chemokines
  • Cytokines
  • Dendritic cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

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