A model of study for human cancer: Spontaneous occurring tumors in dogs. Biological features and translation for new anticancer therapies

G. Ranieri, C. D. Gadaleta, R. Patruno, N. Zizzo, M. G. Daidone, M. G. Hansson, A. Paradiso, D. Ribatti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Murine cancer models have been extremely useful for analyzing the biology of pathways involved in cancer initiation, promotion, and progression. Interestingly, several murine cancer models also exhibit heterogeneity, genomic instability and an intact immune system. However, they do not adequately represent several features that define cancer in humans, including long periods of latency, the complex biology of cancer recurrence and metastasis and outcomes to novel therapies. Therefore, additional models that better investigate the human disease are needed. In the pet population, with special references to the dog, cancer is a spontaneous disease and dogs naturally develop cancers that share many characteristics with human malignancies. More than 40 years ago, optimization of bone marrow transplantation protocols was undertaken in dogs and recently novel targeted therapies such as liposomal muramyl tripeptide phosphatidylethanolamine and several tyrosine kinase inhibitors, namely masitinib (AB1010) and toceranib phosphate (SU11654), have been developed to treat dog tumors which have then been translated to human clinical trials. In this review article, we will analyze biological data from dog tumors and comparative features with human tumors, and new therapeutic approaches translated from dog to human cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)187-197
Number of pages11
JournalCritical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology
Volume88
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2013

Keywords

  • Anticancer therapies
  • Comparative oncology
  • Dog tumors
  • Human tumors
  • Translational research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Hematology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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