A neuropsychological study of dissociation in cortical and subcortical functioning in obsessive-compulsive disorder by Tower of Hanoi Task

Paolo Cavedini, Michele Cisima, Giovanna Riboldi, Arcangela D'Annucci, Laura Bellodi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Several biological models of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) have focused on the roles frontal cortex and basal ganglia dysfunctions play in the expression of the disorder. From a neuropsychological point of view, previous reports have underlined the possible involvement of the prefrontal cortex in declarative functions and the basal ganglia in procedural ones. A possible dissociation of cortical and subcortical functioning has been studied using the Hanoi Tower Task to explore different neuropsychological aspects of problem-solving procedures. Our results indicate that differential cortical and subcortical dysfunctions could contribute to OCD pathophysiology and that procedural and declarative forms might be independent of each other.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)357-363
Number of pages7
JournalBrain and Cognition
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

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