A posterior variant of corticobasal syndrome: Evidence from a longitudinal study of cognitive and functional status in a single case

Carlo Abbate, Pietro Davide Trimarchi, Laura Manzoni, Anna Maria Quarenghi, Gian Pietro Salvi, Silvia Inglese, Fabrizio Giunco, Renzo Bagarolo, Daniela Mari, Beatrice Arosio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We describe a patient (CG) suffering from early onset dementia who presented with corticobasal syndrome (CBS). The aims of the study were as follows: (i) a detailed description of the cognitive phenotype; (ii) a comprehensive, longitudinal evaluation of apraxia; (iii) an appraisal of the impact of apraxia and other cognitive impairments on patient functional status; and (iv) an indirect mapping of degeneration spreading. A three-year longitudinal, observational follow-up study of cognitive and functional status was performed. Four main results emerged. First, an unusual CBS phenotype appeared that was characterized by symmetrical presentation, asymmetrical course, and prominent posterior (bi-parietal) cognitive and motor cortical manifestations. Second, some findings of limb apraxia in CBS were replicated and substantiated; moreover, some novel findings of other cognitive impairments emerged. Third, an early, significant functional decline, probably related to apraxia and to visuospatial attention impairments, became apparent. Fourth, CG’s clinical picture was compatible with an underlying dysfunction of the large-scale, dorsal sensory-motor association network, as already suggested in previous CBS cases. This case report confirms the heterogeneity of CBS and suggests the emergence of a possible less common variant, i.e. the posterior CBS (P-CBS).

Original languageEnglish
Article number1452868
JournalCogent Psychology
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018

Keywords

  • alien hand syndrome
  • brain network
  • corticobasal
  • Keywords
  • limb-apraxia
  • limb-kinetic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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