A single question for the rapid screening of restless legs syndrome in the neurological clinical practice

R. Ferri, B. Lanuzza, F. I I Cosentino, I. Iero, M. Tripodi, R. S. Spada, G. Toscano, S. Marelli, D. Aricò, R. Bella, W. A. Hening, M. Zucconi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purposes of this study were to validate the use of a single standard question for the rapid screening of restless legs syndrome (RLS) and to analyze the eventual effects of the presence of RLS on self-assessed daytime sleepiness, global clinical severity and cognitive functioning. We evaluated a group of 521 consecutive patients who accessed our neurology clinic for different reasons. Beside the answer to the single question and age, sex, and clinical diagnosis, the following items were collected from all patients and normal controls: the four criteria for RLS, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), the Clinical Global Impression of Severity (CGI-S), and the Mini-Mental State evaluation. RLS was found in 112 patients (70 idiopathic). The single question had 100% sensitivity and 96.8% specificity for the diagnosis of RLS. ESS and CGI-S were significantly higher in both RLS patient groups than in normal controls. RLS severity was significantly higher in idiopathic than in associated/symptomatic RLS patients. RLS can be screened with high sensitivity and good reliability in large patient groups by means of the single question; however, the final diagnosis should always be confirmed by the diagnostic features of RLS and accompanied by a careful search for comorbid conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1016-1021
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Neurology
Volume14
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2007

Keywords

  • Diagnosis
  • Obstructive sleep apnea
  • Restless legs syndrome
  • Screening
  • Single question

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

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