A survey in Puglia: The attitudes and opinions of specialists, general physicians and patients on follow-up practice

A. Paradiso, P. Nitti, P. Frezza, N. Scorpiglione

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The follow-up for breast cancer patients is a well established routine practice requiring the organization and coordination of many professional figures and a large expenditure of national health funds. To study the problems in practical clinical management of such a complicated health program in a typical population, a questionnaire survey of the opinions and attitudes of specialists, general practitioners and patients directly involved in clinical follow-up was performed in the Puglia region of Southern Italy. Materials and methods: A representative sample of specialists (n = 285), general practitioners (n = 263) and patients (n = 284) involved in the management of follow-up practice for breast cancer in Puglia received different questionnaires to ascertain their behaviour, attitutes, opinions, perception of the disease and the organizational requirements for treatment. A total of 57.4% of questionnaires were returned. Results and discussion: The most important results were: (a) about one-third of cases complained of difficulties in follow-up management due to the lack of cooperation and integration of follow-up procedures among specialists; (b) the general practitioners preferred to have a more active role in follow-up; (c) the patients reported that being managed by more than one physician, or living far from follow-up facilities resulted in an inferior quality of life.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-56
Number of pages4
JournalAnnals of Oncology
Volume6
Issue numberSUPPL. 2
Publication statusPublished - 1995

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • follow-up
  • general physicians
  • quality of life
  • specialists

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A survey in Puglia: The attitudes and opinions of specialists, general physicians and patients on follow-up practice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this