Abnormal anandamide metabolism in celiac disease

Natalia Battista, Antonio Di Sabatino, Monia Di Tommaso, Paolo Biancheri, Cinzia Rapino, Francesca Vidali, Cinzia Papadia, Chiara Montana, Alessandra Pasini, Alberto Lanzini, Vincenzo Villanacci, Gino R. Corazza, Mauro Maccarrone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The endocannabinoid system has been extensively investigated in experimental colitis and inflammatory bowel disease, but not in celiac disease, where only a single study showed increased levels of the major endocannabinoid anandamide in the atrophic mucosa. On this basis, we aimed to investigate anandamide metabolism in celiac disease by analyzing transcript levels (through quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction), protein concentration (through immunoblotting) and activity (through radioassays) of enzymes responsible for anandamide synthesis (N-acylphosphatidyl-ethanolamine specific phospholipase D, NAPE-PLD) and degradation (fatty acid amide hydrolase, FAAH) in the duodenal mucosa of untreated celiac patients, celiac patients on a gluten-free diet for at least 12 months and control subjects. Also, treated celiac biopsies cultured ex vivo with peptic-tryptic digest of gliadin were investigated. Our in vivo experiments showed that mucosal NAPE-PLD expression and activity are higher in untreated celiac patients than treated celiac patients and controls, with no significant difference between the latter two groups. In keeping with the in vivo data, the ex vivo activity of NAPE-PLD was significantly enhanced by incubation of peptic-tryptic digest of gliadin with treated celiac biopsies. On the contrary, in vivo mucosal FAAH expression and activity did not change in the three groups of patients, and accordingly, mucosal FAAH activity was not influenced by treatment with peptic-tryptic digest of gliadin. In conclusion, our findings provide a possible pathophysiological explanation for the increased anandamide concentration previously shown in active celiac mucosa.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1245-1248
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Nutritional Biochemistry
Volume23
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2012

Fingerprint

Celiac Disease
Gliadin
Metabolism
Phospholipase D
Abdomen
Ethanolamine
Endocannabinoids
Biopsy
Digestion
Mucous Membrane
Glutens
Polymerase chain reaction
RNA-Directed DNA Polymerase
Nutrition
Gluten-Free Diet
Degradation
Colitis
anandamide
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

Keywords

  • Duodenal mucosa
  • Endocannabinoid
  • FAAH
  • Gliadin
  • NAPE-PLD

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Abnormal anandamide metabolism in celiac disease. / Battista, Natalia; Di Sabatino, Antonio; Di Tommaso, Monia; Biancheri, Paolo; Rapino, Cinzia; Vidali, Francesca; Papadia, Cinzia; Montana, Chiara; Pasini, Alessandra; Lanzini, Alberto; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Corazza, Gino R.; Maccarrone, Mauro.

In: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, Vol. 23, No. 10, 10.2012, p. 1245-1248.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Battista, N, Di Sabatino, A, Di Tommaso, M, Biancheri, P, Rapino, C, Vidali, F, Papadia, C, Montana, C, Pasini, A, Lanzini, A, Villanacci, V, Corazza, GR & Maccarrone, M 2012, 'Abnormal anandamide metabolism in celiac disease', Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, vol. 23, no. 10, pp. 1245-1248. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jnutbio.2011.06.017
Battista N, Di Sabatino A, Di Tommaso M, Biancheri P, Rapino C, Vidali F et al. Abnormal anandamide metabolism in celiac disease. Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. 2012 Oct;23(10):1245-1248. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jnutbio.2011.06.017
Battista, Natalia ; Di Sabatino, Antonio ; Di Tommaso, Monia ; Biancheri, Paolo ; Rapino, Cinzia ; Vidali, Francesca ; Papadia, Cinzia ; Montana, Chiara ; Pasini, Alessandra ; Lanzini, Alberto ; Villanacci, Vincenzo ; Corazza, Gino R. ; Maccarrone, Mauro. / Abnormal anandamide metabolism in celiac disease. In: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. 2012 ; Vol. 23, No. 10. pp. 1245-1248.
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