Abnormal motor preparation in severe traumatic brain injury with good recovery

Francesco Di Russo, C. Incoccia, R. Formisano, U. Sabatini, P. Zoccolotti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Movement-related cortical potentials (MRCPs) were examined in seven patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and 12 matched control subjects. All patients had clinically established good recovery by the time of testing. Flexion movements of the index finger of the left or right hand were recorded in two (alternating and repetitive) self-paced conditions and in one externally triggered condition. In control subjects, the bereitschaftspotential (BP) component of MRCP was detected approximately 2000 msec prior to movement onset in the self-paced conditions and was larger and earlier in the alternating compared to the repetitive condition. The BP component was absent in the externally triggered condition. In TBI patients, the BP was greatly reduced and no difference between the alternating-repetitive conditions was detected; in contrast, only small differences were present in the controls for the negative slope (NS) and MP components and no difference for the reafferent positivity (RAP) component. A dipole analysis indicated the supplementary motor area and the premotor area as the likely generators of BP and NS′ components, respectively. Gradient-recalled echo magnetic resonance imaging allowed the detection of a number of small hypointense lesions primarily located in the frontal lobes, as in diffuse axonal injury. This pattern of results indicates a selective deficit in motor preparation and a relatively spared pattern of activation during and following movement in these patients. Imaging data appear generally consistent with the pattern of MRCPs observed in the patient group. Implications of these results for the problem of slowness in TBI patients are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)297-312
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Neurotrauma
Volume22
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2005

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Contingent Negative Variation
Motor Cortex
Diffuse Axonal Injury
Frontal Lobe
Fingers
Traumatic Brain Injury
Hand
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • MRCP
  • Readiness potentials
  • Source analysis
  • TBI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Abnormal motor preparation in severe traumatic brain injury with good recovery. / Di Russo, Francesco; Incoccia, C.; Formisano, R.; Sabatini, U.; Zoccolotti, P.

In: Journal of Neurotrauma, Vol. 22, No. 2, 02.2005, p. 297-312.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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