Abnormalities in functional connectivity in borderline personality disorder: Correlations with metacognition and emotion dysregulation

Giulia Quattrini, Lorenzo Pini, Michela Pievani, Laura R Magni, Mariangela Lanfredi, Clarissa Ferrari, Marina Boccardi, Stefano Bignotti, Silvia Magnaldi, Milena Cobelli, Luciana Rillosi, Rossella Beneduce, Giuseppe Rossi, Giovanni B Frisoni, Roberta Rossi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A few studies reported functional abnormalities at rest in borderline personality disorder (BPD), but their relationship with clinical aspect is unclear. We aimed to assess functional connectivity (FC) in BPD patients and its association with BPD clinical features. Twenty-one BPD patients and 14 healthy controls (HC) underwent a multidimensional assessment and resting-state fMRI. Independent component analysis was performed to identify three resting-state networks: default mode network (DMN), salience network (SN), and executive control network (ECN). FC differences between BPD and HC were assessed with voxel-wise two-sample t-tests. Additionally, we investigated the mean FC within each network and the relationship between connectivity measures and BPD clinical features. Patients showed significant lower mean FC in the DMN and SN, while, at the local level, a cluster of lower functional connectivity emerged in the posterior cingulate cortex of the DMN. The DMN connectivity was positively correlated with the anger-state intensity and expression, while the SN connectivity was positively correlated with metacognitive abilities and a negative correlation emerged with the interpersonal aggression. The dysfunctional connectivity within these networks might explain clinical features of BPD patients.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPsychiatry Research - Neuroimaging
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Dec 20 2018

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