Absence of otoacoustic emissions in insulin-dependent diabetic patients: Is there evidence for diabetic cochleopathy?

Francesco Ottaviani, Nicoletta Dozio, Cesare B. Neglia, Stefano Riccio, Marina Scavini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In order to evaluate cochlear function in Type 1 diabetes mellitus, this study analyses otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) on normal hearing subjects with diabetes and on controls. Patients with Type 1 diabetes (n=60), with a mean age of 31±6.23 years, mean disease duration of 17.5±8.9 years, and mean HbA1c of 8.1±1.8%, of whom 43% had signs of retinopathy and 28% had clinical signs of neuropathy, were studied. All patients underwent an OAE analysis and brainstem-evoked potentials. Fifty-eight normal volunteers were used as controls for the OAE analysis. Seventeen patients (28.3%) had no OAEs in at least one ear and 10% in both ears. The mean intensity of the response was lower in diabetic subjects [7.1±4.4 vs. 10.9±9.3 dB SPL (sound pressure level)] than in controls. The cochlear impairment was over 5 dB for the 1-kHz frequency, which is the critical level for speech understanding. These findings suggest that cochleopathy can be detected in a relatively high proportion of subjects with Type 1 diabetes in spite of a normal audiometric hearing threshold.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)338-343
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Diabetes and its Complications
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2002

Keywords

  • Auditory brainstem responses
  • Cochleopathy
  • Microvascular diabetic complications
  • Otoacoustic emissions
  • Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Absence of otoacoustic emissions in insulin-dependent diabetic patients: Is there evidence for diabetic cochleopathy?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this