Acetic acid bacteria genomes reveal functional traits for adaptation to life in insect guts

Bessem Chouaia, Stefano Gaiarsa, Elena Crotti, Francesco Comandatore, Mauro Degli Esposti, Irene Ricci, Alberto Alma, Guido Favia, Claudio Bandi, Daniele Daffonchio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) live in sugar rich environments, including food matrices, plant tissues, and the gut of sugar-feeding insects. By comparing the newly sequenced genomes of Asaia platycodi and Saccharibacter sp., symbionts of Anopheles stephensi and Apis mellifera, respectively, with those of 14 other AAB,we provide a genomic view of the evolutionary pattern of this bacterial group and clues on traits that explain the success of AAB as insect symbionts. A specific pre-adaptive trait, cytochrome bo3 ubiquinol oxidase, appears ancestral inAABandshows aphylogeny that iscongruent with thatof thegenomes.The functional properties of this terminal oxidase might have allowed AAB to adapt to the diverse oxygen levels of arthropod guts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)912-920
Number of pages9
JournalGenome Biology and Evolution
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Acetic acid bacteria
  • Cytochrome oxidase
  • Symbiosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics
  • Medicine(all)

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