Acting like a tough guy

Violent-sexist video games, identification with game characters, masculine beliefs, & empathy for female violence victims

Alessandro Gabbiadini, Paolo Riva, Luca Andrighetto, Chiara Volpato, Brad J. Bushman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Empathy-putting oneself in another's shoes-has been described as the "social glue" that holds society together. This study investigates how exposure to sexist video games can decrease empathy for female violence victims.We hypothesized that playing violent-sexist video games would increase endorsement of masculine beliefs, especially among participants who highly identify with dominant and aggressive male game characters. We also hypothesized that the endorsement of masculine beliefs would reduce empathy toward female violence victims. Participants (N = 154) were randomly assigned to play a violentsexist game, a violent-only game, or a non-violent game. After gameplay, measures of identification with the game character, traditional masculine beliefs, and empathy for female violence victims were assessed. We found that participants' gender and their identification with the violent male video game character moderated the effects of the exposure to sexist-violent video games on masculine beliefs. Our results supported the prediction that playing violent- sexist video games increases masculine beliefs, which occurred for male (but not female) participants who were highly identified with the game character. Masculine beliefs, in turn, negatively predicted empathic feelings for female violence victims. Overall, our study shows who is most affected by the exposure to sexist-violent video games, and why the effects occur. (200 words).

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0152121
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2016

Fingerprint

Video Games
violence
Violence
Glues
Shoes
adhesives
Adhesives
Identification (Psychology)
Emotions
prediction
gender

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Acting like a tough guy : Violent-sexist video games, identification with game characters, masculine beliefs, & empathy for female violence victims. / Gabbiadini, Alessandro; Riva, Paolo; Andrighetto, Luca; Volpato, Chiara; Bushman, Brad J.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 4, e0152121, 01.04.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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