Activated intrahepatic antigen-presenting cells inhibit hepatitis B virus replication in the liver of transgenic mice

Kiminori Kimura, Kazuhiro Kakimi, Stefan Wieland, Luca G. Guidotti, Francis V. Chisari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this study we evaluated the ability of activated intrahepatic APCs to inhibit hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication in transgenic mice. Intrahepatic APCs were activated by administration of an anti-CD40 agonistic mAb (αCD40). We showed that a single i.v. injection of αCD40 was sufficient to inhibit HBV replication noncytopathically by a process associated with the recruitment of dendritic cells, macrophages, T cells, and NK cells into the liver and the induction of inflammatory cytokines. The antiviral effect depended on the production of IL-12 and TNF-α by activated APCs; however, it was mediated primarily by IFN-γ produced by NK cells, and possibly T cells, that were activated by IL-12. Collectively, these results suggest that activated APCs can directly produce antiviral cytokines (IL-12, TNF-α) and trigger the production of other cytokines (i.e., IFN-γ) by other cells (e.g., NK cells and T cells) that do not express CD40. These results provide insight into a hitherto unsuspected antiviral function of intrahepatic APCs, and they suggest that therapeutic activation of APCs may represent a new strategy for the treatment of chronic HBV infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5188-5195
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume169
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Activated intrahepatic antigen-presenting cells inhibit hepatitis B virus replication in the liver of transgenic mice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this