Acute modulation of brain connectivity in Parkinson disease after automatic mechanical peripheral stimulation: A pilot study

Carlo Cosimo Quattrocchi, Maria Francesca De Pandis, Claudia Piervincenzi, Manuela Galli, Jean Marc Melgari, Gaetano Salomone, Patrizio Sale, Carlo Augusto Mallio, Filippo Carducci, Fabrizio Stocchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective The present study shows the results of a double-blind sham-controlled pilot trial to test whether measurable stimulus-specific functional connectivity changes exist after Automatic Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation (AMPS) in patients with idiopathic Parkinson Disease. Methods Eleven patients (6 women and 5 men) with idiopathic Parkinson Disease underwent brain fMRI immediately before and after sham or effective AMPS. Resting state Functional Connectivity (RSFC) was assessed using the seed-ROI based analysis. Seed ROIs were positioned on basal ganglia, on primary sensory-motor cortices, on the supplementary motor areas and on the cerebellum. Individual differences for pre-and post-effective AMPS and pre-and post-sham condition were obtained and first entered in respective one-sample ttest analyses, to evaluate the mean effect of condition. Results Effective AMPS, but not sham stimulation, induced increase of RSFC of the sensory motor cortex, nucleus striatum and cerebellum. Secondly, individual differences for both conditions were entered into paired group t-Test analysis to rule out sub-Threshold effects of sham stimulation, which showed stronger connectivity of the striatum nucleus with the right lateral occipital cortex and the cuneal cortex (max Z score 3.12) and with the right anterior temporal lobe (max Z score 3.42) and of the cerebellum with the right lateral occipital cortex and the right cerebellar cortex (max Z score 3.79). Conclusions Our results suggest that effective AMPS acutely increases RSFC of brain regions involved in visuo-spatial and sensory-motor integration. Classification of Evidence This study provides Class II evidence that automatic mechanical peripheral stimulation is effective inmodulating brain functional connectivity of patients with Parkinson Disease at rest.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberA1222
JournalPLoS One
Volume10
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 15 2015

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Parkinson disease
Cerebellum
Parkinson Disease
Occipital Lobe
Brain
cortex
cerebellum
Motor Cortex
Modulation
brain
Individuality
Seeds
Seed
Cerebellar Cortex
Temporal Lobe
Basal Ganglia
seeds
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Sensorimotor Cortex
testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Acute modulation of brain connectivity in Parkinson disease after automatic mechanical peripheral stimulation : A pilot study. / Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; De Pandis, Maria Francesca; Piervincenzi, Claudia; Galli, Manuela; Melgari, Jean Marc; Salomone, Gaetano; Sale, Patrizio; Mallio, Carlo Augusto; Carducci, Filippo; Stocchi, Fabrizio.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 10, No. 10, A1222, 15.10.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Quattrocchi, CC, De Pandis, MF, Piervincenzi, C, Galli, M, Melgari, JM, Salomone, G, Sale, P, Mallio, CA, Carducci, F & Stocchi, F 2015, 'Acute modulation of brain connectivity in Parkinson disease after automatic mechanical peripheral stimulation: A pilot study', PLoS One, vol. 10, no. 10, A1222. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0137977
Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo ; De Pandis, Maria Francesca ; Piervincenzi, Claudia ; Galli, Manuela ; Melgari, Jean Marc ; Salomone, Gaetano ; Sale, Patrizio ; Mallio, Carlo Augusto ; Carducci, Filippo ; Stocchi, Fabrizio. / Acute modulation of brain connectivity in Parkinson disease after automatic mechanical peripheral stimulation : A pilot study. In: PLoS One. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 10.
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N2 - Objective The present study shows the results of a double-blind sham-controlled pilot trial to test whether measurable stimulus-specific functional connectivity changes exist after Automatic Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation (AMPS) in patients with idiopathic Parkinson Disease. Methods Eleven patients (6 women and 5 men) with idiopathic Parkinson Disease underwent brain fMRI immediately before and after sham or effective AMPS. Resting state Functional Connectivity (RSFC) was assessed using the seed-ROI based analysis. Seed ROIs were positioned on basal ganglia, on primary sensory-motor cortices, on the supplementary motor areas and on the cerebellum. Individual differences for pre-and post-effective AMPS and pre-and post-sham condition were obtained and first entered in respective one-sample ttest analyses, to evaluate the mean effect of condition. Results Effective AMPS, but not sham stimulation, induced increase of RSFC of the sensory motor cortex, nucleus striatum and cerebellum. Secondly, individual differences for both conditions were entered into paired group t-Test analysis to rule out sub-Threshold effects of sham stimulation, which showed stronger connectivity of the striatum nucleus with the right lateral occipital cortex and the cuneal cortex (max Z score 3.12) and with the right anterior temporal lobe (max Z score 3.42) and of the cerebellum with the right lateral occipital cortex and the right cerebellar cortex (max Z score 3.79). Conclusions Our results suggest that effective AMPS acutely increases RSFC of brain regions involved in visuo-spatial and sensory-motor integration. Classification of Evidence This study provides Class II evidence that automatic mechanical peripheral stimulation is effective inmodulating brain functional connectivity of patients with Parkinson Disease at rest.

AB - Objective The present study shows the results of a double-blind sham-controlled pilot trial to test whether measurable stimulus-specific functional connectivity changes exist after Automatic Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation (AMPS) in patients with idiopathic Parkinson Disease. Methods Eleven patients (6 women and 5 men) with idiopathic Parkinson Disease underwent brain fMRI immediately before and after sham or effective AMPS. Resting state Functional Connectivity (RSFC) was assessed using the seed-ROI based analysis. Seed ROIs were positioned on basal ganglia, on primary sensory-motor cortices, on the supplementary motor areas and on the cerebellum. Individual differences for pre-and post-effective AMPS and pre-and post-sham condition were obtained and first entered in respective one-sample ttest analyses, to evaluate the mean effect of condition. Results Effective AMPS, but not sham stimulation, induced increase of RSFC of the sensory motor cortex, nucleus striatum and cerebellum. Secondly, individual differences for both conditions were entered into paired group t-Test analysis to rule out sub-Threshold effects of sham stimulation, which showed stronger connectivity of the striatum nucleus with the right lateral occipital cortex and the cuneal cortex (max Z score 3.12) and with the right anterior temporal lobe (max Z score 3.42) and of the cerebellum with the right lateral occipital cortex and the right cerebellar cortex (max Z score 3.79). Conclusions Our results suggest that effective AMPS acutely increases RSFC of brain regions involved in visuo-spatial and sensory-motor integration. Classification of Evidence This study provides Class II evidence that automatic mechanical peripheral stimulation is effective inmodulating brain functional connectivity of patients with Parkinson Disease at rest.

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