Adaptation to oxidative stress, chemoresistance, and cell survival

Matteo Landriscina, Francesca Maddalena, Gabriella Laudiero, Franca Esposito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

139 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The discovery of some additional properties and functions of reactive oxygen species (ROS), beyond their toxic effects, provides a novel scenario for the molecular basis and cell regulation of several pathophysiologic processes. ROS are generated by redox-sensitive, prosurvival signaling pathways and function as second messengers in the transduction of several extracellular signals. A complex intracellular redox buffering network has developed to adapt and protect cells against the dangerous effects of oxidative stress. However, pathways involved in ROS-adaptive response may also play a critical role in protecting cells against cytotoxic effects of anticancer agents, thus supporting the hypothesis of a correlation between adaptation/resistance to oxidative stress and resistance to anticancer drugs. This review summarizes the main systems involved in the adaptive responses: an overview on the pathophysiologic relevance of mitochondria on redox-sensitive transcription factors and genes and main antioxidant networks in tumor cells is provided. One of the major aims is to highlight the adaptive mechanisms and their interplay in the intricate connection between oncogenic signaling, oxidative stress, and chemoresistance. Clarification of these mechanisms has tremendous application potential, in terms of developing novel molecular-targeted anticancer therapies and innovative strategies for rational combination of these agents with chemotherapeutic or tumor-specific biologic drugs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2701-2716
Number of pages16
JournalAntioxidants and Redox Signaling
Volume11
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2009

Fingerprint

Oxidative stress
Reactive Oxygen Species
Cell Survival
Oxidative Stress
Cells
Oxidation-Reduction
Tumors
Mitochondria
Poisons
Second Messenger Systems
Molecular Targeted Therapy
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Antineoplastic Agents
Transcription Factors
Antioxidants
Genes
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Physiology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Landriscina, M., Maddalena, F., Laudiero, G., & Esposito, F. (2009). Adaptation to oxidative stress, chemoresistance, and cell survival. Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, 11(11), 2701-2716. https://doi.org/10.1089/ars.2009.2692

Adaptation to oxidative stress, chemoresistance, and cell survival. / Landriscina, Matteo; Maddalena, Francesca; Laudiero, Gabriella; Esposito, Franca.

In: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, Vol. 11, No. 11, 01.11.2009, p. 2701-2716.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Landriscina, M, Maddalena, F, Laudiero, G & Esposito, F 2009, 'Adaptation to oxidative stress, chemoresistance, and cell survival', Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, vol. 11, no. 11, pp. 2701-2716. https://doi.org/10.1089/ars.2009.2692
Landriscina, Matteo ; Maddalena, Francesca ; Laudiero, Gabriella ; Esposito, Franca. / Adaptation to oxidative stress, chemoresistance, and cell survival. In: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling. 2009 ; Vol. 11, No. 11. pp. 2701-2716.
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