Administration of temozolomide during and after radiotherapy for newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas excluding glioblastoma multiforme

Giuseppe Luigi Banna, Daniela Bettio, Marta Scorsetti, Pierina Navarria, Matteo Simonelli, Riccardo Rodriguez Baena, Enrico Aimar, Paolo Gaetani, PierGiuseppe Colombo, Felice Rognone, Armando Santoro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Primary brain high-grade gliomas, excluding glioblastoma are rare and heterogeneous tumors, showing different characteristic mutations and a better prognosis than glioblastomas. The addition of chemotherapy to the radiotherapy in the newly diagnosed disease has not been established yet. We treated 9 patients with newly diagnosed tumors with temozolomide at 75 mg/m2 for 7 days a week during standard radiotherapy, followed by six cycles at 200 mg/m2 on days 1-5 every 28 days. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for the 1 p/19 q loss was performed in seven out of the 9 patients. With a median follow-up of 15 months (range, 8-50), eight patients are alive and one died from disease progression. Four patients had disease progression at 7, 15, 14 and 13 months from the diagnosis. The 1 p/19 q loss was found in 5 patients; three have no evidence of disease, one had partial disease remission and one disease progression. Toxicities included one discitis requiring treatment withdrawal and specific antibiotic therapy, and one transient grade 3 psoriasiform reaction. Based on this small series of patients, the addition of temozolomide to radiotherapy may be recommended.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)323-325
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Neuro-Oncology
Volume81
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2007

Keywords

  • Adjuvant therapy
  • Concomitant therapy
  • High-grade glioma
  • Malignant glioma
  • Radiotherapy
  • Temozolomide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Administration of temozolomide during and after radiotherapy for newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas excluding glioblastoma multiforme'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this