Advanced carcinomas of the oropharynx treated with radiotherapy-A comparison of three different fractionation schemes

Carlo Fallai, Patrizia Olmi, Enrico Cellai

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6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: This report reflects a retrospective comparison among historical series of patients with similar site and stage of disease treated by three fractionation schemes. Materlals and Methods. A hyperfractionation (HF) scheme delivered 1 Gy three times a day, 5 days a week, to a total dose of 60 to 63 Gy over 26 to 29 days. A group of 48 patients received HF. Accelerated fractionation (AF) consists of 2 Gy three times a day, 5 days a week, to a total of 48 to 52 Gy delivered over 11 to 12 days. A group of 46 patients underwent this therapy. A third group of 48 patients were treated with conventional fractionation (CF). These patients received 2 Gy each day, 5 days a week, to a total dose of 60 to 66 Gy. Results: Ned survival at 5 years was 23.8%, 32.8%, and 29.3% for CF, AF, and HF, respectively. The most important cause of failure was inability to control disease at the primary site; however, isolated distant metastasis were observed in 15.4% of all failures. Treatment delays were more common in the HF and CF groups. The highest incidence of late complications occurred in the AF group. Conclusions: Advanced lesions of the oropharynx have an ominous prognosis. New fractionation regimens represent a warranted approach as an alternative to or an integration into combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)31-37
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1993

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Oropharynx
Radiotherapy
Carcinoma
Neoplasm Metastasis
Drug Therapy
Survival
Incidence
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

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title = "Advanced carcinomas of the oropharynx treated with radiotherapy-A comparison of three different fractionation schemes",
abstract = "Introduction: This report reflects a retrospective comparison among historical series of patients with similar site and stage of disease treated by three fractionation schemes. Materlals and Methods. A hyperfractionation (HF) scheme delivered 1 Gy three times a day, 5 days a week, to a total dose of 60 to 63 Gy over 26 to 29 days. A group of 48 patients received HF. Accelerated fractionation (AF) consists of 2 Gy three times a day, 5 days a week, to a total of 48 to 52 Gy delivered over 11 to 12 days. A group of 46 patients underwent this therapy. A third group of 48 patients were treated with conventional fractionation (CF). These patients received 2 Gy each day, 5 days a week, to a total dose of 60 to 66 Gy. Results: Ned survival at 5 years was 23.8{\%}, 32.8{\%}, and 29.3{\%} for CF, AF, and HF, respectively. The most important cause of failure was inability to control disease at the primary site; however, isolated distant metastasis were observed in 15.4{\%} of all failures. Treatment delays were more common in the HF and CF groups. The highest incidence of late complications occurred in the AF group. Conclusions: Advanced lesions of the oropharynx have an ominous prognosis. New fractionation regimens represent a warranted approach as an alternative to or an integration into combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy.",
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AU - Olmi, Patrizia

AU - Cellai, Enrico

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N2 - Introduction: This report reflects a retrospective comparison among historical series of patients with similar site and stage of disease treated by three fractionation schemes. Materlals and Methods. A hyperfractionation (HF) scheme delivered 1 Gy three times a day, 5 days a week, to a total dose of 60 to 63 Gy over 26 to 29 days. A group of 48 patients received HF. Accelerated fractionation (AF) consists of 2 Gy three times a day, 5 days a week, to a total of 48 to 52 Gy delivered over 11 to 12 days. A group of 46 patients underwent this therapy. A third group of 48 patients were treated with conventional fractionation (CF). These patients received 2 Gy each day, 5 days a week, to a total dose of 60 to 66 Gy. Results: Ned survival at 5 years was 23.8%, 32.8%, and 29.3% for CF, AF, and HF, respectively. The most important cause of failure was inability to control disease at the primary site; however, isolated distant metastasis were observed in 15.4% of all failures. Treatment delays were more common in the HF and CF groups. The highest incidence of late complications occurred in the AF group. Conclusions: Advanced lesions of the oropharynx have an ominous prognosis. New fractionation regimens represent a warranted approach as an alternative to or an integration into combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

AB - Introduction: This report reflects a retrospective comparison among historical series of patients with similar site and stage of disease treated by three fractionation schemes. Materlals and Methods. A hyperfractionation (HF) scheme delivered 1 Gy three times a day, 5 days a week, to a total dose of 60 to 63 Gy over 26 to 29 days. A group of 48 patients received HF. Accelerated fractionation (AF) consists of 2 Gy three times a day, 5 days a week, to a total of 48 to 52 Gy delivered over 11 to 12 days. A group of 46 patients underwent this therapy. A third group of 48 patients were treated with conventional fractionation (CF). These patients received 2 Gy each day, 5 days a week, to a total dose of 60 to 66 Gy. Results: Ned survival at 5 years was 23.8%, 32.8%, and 29.3% for CF, AF, and HF, respectively. The most important cause of failure was inability to control disease at the primary site; however, isolated distant metastasis were observed in 15.4% of all failures. Treatment delays were more common in the HF and CF groups. The highest incidence of late complications occurred in the AF group. Conclusions: Advanced lesions of the oropharynx have an ominous prognosis. New fractionation regimens represent a warranted approach as an alternative to or an integration into combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

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