Adverse childhood experiences associate to reduced glutamate levels in the hippocampus of patients affected by mood disorders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Adverse childhood experiences (ACE) can possibly permanently alter the stress response system, affect the glutamatergic system and influence hippocampal volume in mood disorders. The aim of the study is to investigate the association between glutamate levels in the hippocampus, measured through single proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS), and ACE in patients affected by mood disorders and healthy controls. Higher levels of early stress associate to reduced levels of Glx/Cr in the hippocampus in depressed patients but not in healthy controls. Exposure to stress during early life could lead to a hypofunctionality of the glutamatergic system in the hippocampus of depressed patients. Abnormalities of glutamatergic signaling could then possibly underpin the structural and functional abnormalities observed in patients affected by mood disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-122
Number of pages6
JournalProgress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry
Volume71
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 3 2016

Keywords

  • Early stress
  • Glutamate
  • Mood disorders
  • Spectroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Biological Psychiatry

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