Aging in Italy: Urban-rural differences

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Urban and rural living environments play a key role in social gerontology. The aim of this paper is to examine urban-rural differences in Italy against some influencing key factors as well as to analyse whether these differences can be explained by the environmental setting or the age and, in some cases, the education of its elderly population. The study is based on data collected from the European funded MOBILATE 2000 project, which was carried out in Finland, The Netherlands, Hungary, Germany, and Italy. The Italian sample (600 subjects) was divided into rural and urban areas, and stratified according to gender and age. Older people living in rural areas were always significantly less well educated than those in urban areas. The average rural household size was larger than its urban counterpart. In general, Italian elderly people living in rural areas were less likely to live alone than their European peers. The social network was usually located close to the respondents' houses. Investigation of leisure activities and the use of new technologies revealed that elderly urban dwellers were not only more active than their rural peers, but also more technologically minded. A regression analysis (R2 = 0.551) of the number of new technologies used by subjects, yielded living area, age, years of education (the strongest explanatory variable), and number of leisure activities performed as predictors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)243-260
Number of pages18
JournalArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2007

Fingerprint

Italy
rural area
Leisure Activities
new technology
urban area
Technology
Education
household size
gerontology
Hungary
Finland
Social Support
Geriatrics
Netherlands
Germany
education
social network
regression analysis
Regression Analysis
gender

Keywords

  • Older persons
  • Rural and urban areas
  • Subjective well-being
  • Use of new technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ageing
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Aging in Italy : Urban-rural differences. / Marcellini, Fiorella; Giuli, Cinzia; Gagliardi, Cristina; Papa, Roberta.

In: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Vol. 44, No. 3, 05.2007, p. 243-260.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ec647e7693964e1f9c978b5854f9b23a,
title = "Aging in Italy: Urban-rural differences",
abstract = "Urban and rural living environments play a key role in social gerontology. The aim of this paper is to examine urban-rural differences in Italy against some influencing key factors as well as to analyse whether these differences can be explained by the environmental setting or the age and, in some cases, the education of its elderly population. The study is based on data collected from the European funded MOBILATE 2000 project, which was carried out in Finland, The Netherlands, Hungary, Germany, and Italy. The Italian sample (600 subjects) was divided into rural and urban areas, and stratified according to gender and age. Older people living in rural areas were always significantly less well educated than those in urban areas. The average rural household size was larger than its urban counterpart. In general, Italian elderly people living in rural areas were less likely to live alone than their European peers. The social network was usually located close to the respondents' houses. Investigation of leisure activities and the use of new technologies revealed that elderly urban dwellers were not only more active than their rural peers, but also more technologically minded. A regression analysis (R2 = 0.551) of the number of new technologies used by subjects, yielded living area, age, years of education (the strongest explanatory variable), and number of leisure activities performed as predictors.",
keywords = "Older persons, Rural and urban areas, Subjective well-being, Use of new technology",
author = "Fiorella Marcellini and Cinzia Giuli and Cristina Gagliardi and Roberta Papa",
year = "2007",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.archger.2006.05.004",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "243--260",
journal = "Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics",
issn = "0167-4943",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Aging in Italy

T2 - Urban-rural differences

AU - Marcellini, Fiorella

AU - Giuli, Cinzia

AU - Gagliardi, Cristina

AU - Papa, Roberta

PY - 2007/5

Y1 - 2007/5

N2 - Urban and rural living environments play a key role in social gerontology. The aim of this paper is to examine urban-rural differences in Italy against some influencing key factors as well as to analyse whether these differences can be explained by the environmental setting or the age and, in some cases, the education of its elderly population. The study is based on data collected from the European funded MOBILATE 2000 project, which was carried out in Finland, The Netherlands, Hungary, Germany, and Italy. The Italian sample (600 subjects) was divided into rural and urban areas, and stratified according to gender and age. Older people living in rural areas were always significantly less well educated than those in urban areas. The average rural household size was larger than its urban counterpart. In general, Italian elderly people living in rural areas were less likely to live alone than their European peers. The social network was usually located close to the respondents' houses. Investigation of leisure activities and the use of new technologies revealed that elderly urban dwellers were not only more active than their rural peers, but also more technologically minded. A regression analysis (R2 = 0.551) of the number of new technologies used by subjects, yielded living area, age, years of education (the strongest explanatory variable), and number of leisure activities performed as predictors.

AB - Urban and rural living environments play a key role in social gerontology. The aim of this paper is to examine urban-rural differences in Italy against some influencing key factors as well as to analyse whether these differences can be explained by the environmental setting or the age and, in some cases, the education of its elderly population. The study is based on data collected from the European funded MOBILATE 2000 project, which was carried out in Finland, The Netherlands, Hungary, Germany, and Italy. The Italian sample (600 subjects) was divided into rural and urban areas, and stratified according to gender and age. Older people living in rural areas were always significantly less well educated than those in urban areas. The average rural household size was larger than its urban counterpart. In general, Italian elderly people living in rural areas were less likely to live alone than their European peers. The social network was usually located close to the respondents' houses. Investigation of leisure activities and the use of new technologies revealed that elderly urban dwellers were not only more active than their rural peers, but also more technologically minded. A regression analysis (R2 = 0.551) of the number of new technologies used by subjects, yielded living area, age, years of education (the strongest explanatory variable), and number of leisure activities performed as predictors.

KW - Older persons

KW - Rural and urban areas

KW - Subjective well-being

KW - Use of new technology

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33846894088&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33846894088&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.archger.2006.05.004

DO - 10.1016/j.archger.2006.05.004

M3 - Article

C2 - 16904766

AN - SCOPUS:33846894088

VL - 44

SP - 243

EP - 260

JO - Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics

JF - Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics

SN - 0167-4943

IS - 3

ER -