Alcohol and breast cancer risk defined by estrogen and progesterone receptor status: A case-control study

Silvia Deandrea, Renato Talamini, Roberto Foschi, Maurizio Montella, Luigino Dal Maso, Fabio Falcini, Carlo La Vecchia, Silvia Franceschi, Eva Negri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Alcohol consumption increases breast cancer risk. Some studies suggested that this association is stronger or limited to tumors expressing estrogen receptors (ER). Methods: We investigated the role of alcohol according to ER and progesterone receptor (PR) status in a case-control study on breast cancer conducted from 1991 to 1994 in three Italian areas. Cases were 989 women with incident, histologically confirmed breast cancer. Controls were 1,350 women admitted to hospitals in the same catchment areas for acute nonneoplastic diseases. A validated food-frequency questionnaire was used to collect information on dietary habits and lifetime consumption of various alcoholic beverages. Multiple logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Results: Alcohol drinking was associated with ER+ tumors (odds ratio, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.68-2.76 for an intake of ≥13.8 g/d as compared with nondrinkers). The odds ratio was 1.13 (95% CI, 1.07-1.20) for a 10-g increase in daily intake. For ER- tumors, the relation with alcohol consumption was not significant (odds ratio, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.93-2.01). When breast cancers were further classified according to PR, the findings for ER+PR+ cancers were similar to those for all ER+ ones, with an odds ratio of 2.34 (95% CI, 1.81-3.04) for an intake of ≥13.8 g/d. No significant association emerged for ER-PR-tumors (odds ratio, 1.25; 95% CI, 0.81-1.94). Conclusion: This study supports the hypothesis that alcohol is more strongly related to ER+ than to ER-breast tumors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2025-2028
Number of pages4
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume17
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2008

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Progesterone Receptors
Estrogen Receptors
Case-Control Studies
Alcohols
Breast Neoplasms
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Alcohol Drinking
Neoplasms
Logistic Models
Alcoholic Beverages
Acute Disease
Feeding Behavior
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

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Alcohol and breast cancer risk defined by estrogen and progesterone receptor status : A case-control study. / Deandrea, Silvia; Talamini, Renato; Foschi, Roberto; Montella, Maurizio; Dal Maso, Luigino; Falcini, Fabio; La Vecchia, Carlo; Franceschi, Silvia; Negri, Eva.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 17, No. 8, 08.2008, p. 2025-2028.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Deandrea, Silvia ; Talamini, Renato ; Foschi, Roberto ; Montella, Maurizio ; Dal Maso, Luigino ; Falcini, Fabio ; La Vecchia, Carlo ; Franceschi, Silvia ; Negri, Eva. / Alcohol and breast cancer risk defined by estrogen and progesterone receptor status : A case-control study. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2008 ; Vol. 17, No. 8. pp. 2025-2028.
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abstract = "Background: Alcohol consumption increases breast cancer risk. Some studies suggested that this association is stronger or limited to tumors expressing estrogen receptors (ER). Methods: We investigated the role of alcohol according to ER and progesterone receptor (PR) status in a case-control study on breast cancer conducted from 1991 to 1994 in three Italian areas. Cases were 989 women with incident, histologically confirmed breast cancer. Controls were 1,350 women admitted to hospitals in the same catchment areas for acute nonneoplastic diseases. A validated food-frequency questionnaire was used to collect information on dietary habits and lifetime consumption of various alcoholic beverages. Multiple logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95{\%} confidence interval (95{\%} CI). Results: Alcohol drinking was associated with ER+ tumors (odds ratio, 2.16; 95{\%} CI, 1.68-2.76 for an intake of ≥13.8 g/d as compared with nondrinkers). The odds ratio was 1.13 (95{\%} CI, 1.07-1.20) for a 10-g increase in daily intake. For ER- tumors, the relation with alcohol consumption was not significant (odds ratio, 1.36; 95{\%} CI, 0.93-2.01). When breast cancers were further classified according to PR, the findings for ER+PR+ cancers were similar to those for all ER+ ones, with an odds ratio of 2.34 (95{\%} CI, 1.81-3.04) for an intake of ≥13.8 g/d. No significant association emerged for ER-PR-tumors (odds ratio, 1.25; 95{\%} CI, 0.81-1.94). Conclusion: This study supports the hypothesis that alcohol is more strongly related to ER+ than to ER-breast tumors.",
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T1 - Alcohol and breast cancer risk defined by estrogen and progesterone receptor status

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AU - Deandrea, Silvia

AU - Talamini, Renato

AU - Foschi, Roberto

AU - Montella, Maurizio

AU - Dal Maso, Luigino

AU - Falcini, Fabio

AU - La Vecchia, Carlo

AU - Franceschi, Silvia

AU - Negri, Eva

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N2 - Background: Alcohol consumption increases breast cancer risk. Some studies suggested that this association is stronger or limited to tumors expressing estrogen receptors (ER). Methods: We investigated the role of alcohol according to ER and progesterone receptor (PR) status in a case-control study on breast cancer conducted from 1991 to 1994 in three Italian areas. Cases were 989 women with incident, histologically confirmed breast cancer. Controls were 1,350 women admitted to hospitals in the same catchment areas for acute nonneoplastic diseases. A validated food-frequency questionnaire was used to collect information on dietary habits and lifetime consumption of various alcoholic beverages. Multiple logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Results: Alcohol drinking was associated with ER+ tumors (odds ratio, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.68-2.76 for an intake of ≥13.8 g/d as compared with nondrinkers). The odds ratio was 1.13 (95% CI, 1.07-1.20) for a 10-g increase in daily intake. For ER- tumors, the relation with alcohol consumption was not significant (odds ratio, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.93-2.01). When breast cancers were further classified according to PR, the findings for ER+PR+ cancers were similar to those for all ER+ ones, with an odds ratio of 2.34 (95% CI, 1.81-3.04) for an intake of ≥13.8 g/d. No significant association emerged for ER-PR-tumors (odds ratio, 1.25; 95% CI, 0.81-1.94). Conclusion: This study supports the hypothesis that alcohol is more strongly related to ER+ than to ER-breast tumors.

AB - Background: Alcohol consumption increases breast cancer risk. Some studies suggested that this association is stronger or limited to tumors expressing estrogen receptors (ER). Methods: We investigated the role of alcohol according to ER and progesterone receptor (PR) status in a case-control study on breast cancer conducted from 1991 to 1994 in three Italian areas. Cases were 989 women with incident, histologically confirmed breast cancer. Controls were 1,350 women admitted to hospitals in the same catchment areas for acute nonneoplastic diseases. A validated food-frequency questionnaire was used to collect information on dietary habits and lifetime consumption of various alcoholic beverages. Multiple logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Results: Alcohol drinking was associated with ER+ tumors (odds ratio, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.68-2.76 for an intake of ≥13.8 g/d as compared with nondrinkers). The odds ratio was 1.13 (95% CI, 1.07-1.20) for a 10-g increase in daily intake. For ER- tumors, the relation with alcohol consumption was not significant (odds ratio, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.93-2.01). When breast cancers were further classified according to PR, the findings for ER+PR+ cancers were similar to those for all ER+ ones, with an odds ratio of 2.34 (95% CI, 1.81-3.04) for an intake of ≥13.8 g/d. No significant association emerged for ER-PR-tumors (odds ratio, 1.25; 95% CI, 0.81-1.94). Conclusion: This study supports the hypothesis that alcohol is more strongly related to ER+ than to ER-breast tumors.

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