Alcohol consumption in mild cognitive impairment and dementia: Harmful or neuroprotective?

Francesco Panza, Vincenza Frisardi, Davide Seripa, Giancarlo Logroscino, Andrea Santamato, Bruno P. Imbimbo, Emanuele Scafato, Alberto Pilotto, Vincenzo Solfrizzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: In several longitudinal studies, light-to-moderate drinking of alcoholic beverages has been proposed as being protective against the development of age-related changes in cognitive function, predementia syndromes, and cognitive decline of degenerative (Alzheimer's disease, AD) or vascular origin (vascular dementia). However, contrasting findings also exist. Method: The English literature published in this area before September 2011 was evaluated, and information relating to the various factors that may impact upon the relationship between alcohol consumption and dementia or predementia syndromes is presented in the succeeding texts. Results: Light-to-moderate alcohol consumption may be associated with a reduced risk of incident overall dementia and AD; however, protective benefits afforded to vascular dementia, cognitive decline, and predementia syndromes are less clear. The equivocal findings may relate to many of the studies being limited to cross-sectional designs, restrictions by age or gender, or incomplete ascertainment. Different outcomes, beverages, drinking patterns, and study follow-up periods or possible interactions with other lifestyle-related (e.g., smoking) or genetic factors (e.g., apolipoprotein E gene variation) may all contribute to the variability of findings. Conclusion: Protective effects of moderate alcohol consumption against cognitive decline are suggested to be more likely in the absence of the AD-associated apolipoprotein E μ4 allele and where wine is the beverage. At present, there is no indication that light-to-moderate alcohol drinking would be harmful to cognition and dementia, and attempts to define what might be deemed beneficial levels of alcohol intake in terms of cognitive performance would be highly problematic and contentious.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1218-1238
Number of pages21
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume27
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

Alcohol Drinking
Dementia
Alzheimer Disease
Vascular Dementia
Beverages
Apolipoproteins E
Cognition
Drinking
Apolipoprotein E4
Literature
Alcoholic Beverages
Wine
Genes
Blood Vessels
Longitudinal Studies
Life Style
Smoking
Alleles
Alcohols
Cognitive Dysfunction

Keywords

  • alcohol
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • dementia
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • predementia syndromes
  • vascular dementia
  • vascular risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Panza, F., Frisardi, V., Seripa, D., Logroscino, G., Santamato, A., Imbimbo, B. P., ... Solfrizzi, V. (2012). Alcohol consumption in mild cognitive impairment and dementia: Harmful or neuroprotective? International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 27(12), 1218-1238. https://doi.org/10.1002/gps.3772

Alcohol consumption in mild cognitive impairment and dementia : Harmful or neuroprotective? / Panza, Francesco; Frisardi, Vincenza; Seripa, Davide; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Santamato, Andrea; Imbimbo, Bruno P.; Scafato, Emanuele; Pilotto, Alberto; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo.

In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Vol. 27, No. 12, 12.2012, p. 1218-1238.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Panza, F, Frisardi, V, Seripa, D, Logroscino, G, Santamato, A, Imbimbo, BP, Scafato, E, Pilotto, A & Solfrizzi, V 2012, 'Alcohol consumption in mild cognitive impairment and dementia: Harmful or neuroprotective?', International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, vol. 27, no. 12, pp. 1218-1238. https://doi.org/10.1002/gps.3772
Panza, Francesco ; Frisardi, Vincenza ; Seripa, Davide ; Logroscino, Giancarlo ; Santamato, Andrea ; Imbimbo, Bruno P. ; Scafato, Emanuele ; Pilotto, Alberto ; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo. / Alcohol consumption in mild cognitive impairment and dementia : Harmful or neuroprotective?. In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2012 ; Vol. 27, No. 12. pp. 1218-1238.
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