Allergenic cross-reactivity among peach, apricot, plum, and cherry in patients with oral allergy syndrome: An in vivo and in vitro study

Elide A. Pastorello, Claudio Ortolani, Laura Farioli, Valerio Pravettoni, Marco Ispano, Åse Borga, Anders Bengtsson, Cristoforo Incorvaia, Candida Berti, Carlo Zanussi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Oral allergy syndrome in response to fruits and vegetables frequently occurs as clusters of hypersensitivity to members of the same botanical family, for which the immunologic basis lies in a number of common allergens, most of them still unidentified. Objective: This study was designed to assess the in vivo and in vitro cross-reactivity between fruits of the Prunoideae subfamily (i.e., peach, cherry, apricot, and plum) and to identify their major allergens and the cross-reactivity of the peach extract with grass and birch pollen. Methods: The in vivo study was conducted by skin prick tests and open food challenges with fresh fuits in 23 patients with oral allergy syndrome for peach and positive skin prick test and RAST results for the other Prunoideae. In vitro sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was followed by immunoblotting and immunoblotting inhibition. Results: A 13 kd component was identified as the only major allergen common to all the Prunoideae, the other major allergens were found at 14 kd in peach and at 30 kd in cherry. Immunoblotting inhibition showed wide cross-reactivity within the Prunoideae, whereas grass and birch pollen partially inhibited the peach blotting. Conclusions: Clinical cross-reactivity to Prunoideae is essentially due to a common 13 kd IgE-binding component, which seems to be the most important major allergen of this subfamily, not shared with grass and birch pollen.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)699-707
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume94
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Allergens
Hypersensitivity
Betula
Pollen
Poaceae
Immunoblotting
Skin Tests
Fruit
Vegetables
Immunoglobulin E
Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis
Sodium
In Vitro Techniques
Prunus domestica
Prunus armeniaca
Prunus persica
Food
Inhibition (Psychology)

Keywords

  • cross-allergenicity
  • immunoblotting
  • Oral allergy syndrome
  • Prunoideae

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Allergenic cross-reactivity among peach, apricot, plum, and cherry in patients with oral allergy syndrome : An in vivo and in vitro study. / Pastorello, Elide A.; Ortolani, Claudio; Farioli, Laura; Pravettoni, Valerio; Ispano, Marco; Borga, Åse; Bengtsson, Anders; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Berti, Candida; Zanussi, Carlo.

In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 94, No. 4, 1994, p. 699-707.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pastorello, Elide A. ; Ortolani, Claudio ; Farioli, Laura ; Pravettoni, Valerio ; Ispano, Marco ; Borga, Åse ; Bengtsson, Anders ; Incorvaia, Cristoforo ; Berti, Candida ; Zanussi, Carlo. / Allergenic cross-reactivity among peach, apricot, plum, and cherry in patients with oral allergy syndrome : An in vivo and in vitro study. In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 1994 ; Vol. 94, No. 4. pp. 699-707.
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T1 - Allergenic cross-reactivity among peach, apricot, plum, and cherry in patients with oral allergy syndrome

T2 - An in vivo and in vitro study

AU - Pastorello, Elide A.

AU - Ortolani, Claudio

AU - Farioli, Laura

AU - Pravettoni, Valerio

AU - Ispano, Marco

AU - Borga, Åse

AU - Bengtsson, Anders

AU - Incorvaia, Cristoforo

AU - Berti, Candida

AU - Zanussi, Carlo

PY - 1994

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N2 - Background: Oral allergy syndrome in response to fruits and vegetables frequently occurs as clusters of hypersensitivity to members of the same botanical family, for which the immunologic basis lies in a number of common allergens, most of them still unidentified. Objective: This study was designed to assess the in vivo and in vitro cross-reactivity between fruits of the Prunoideae subfamily (i.e., peach, cherry, apricot, and plum) and to identify their major allergens and the cross-reactivity of the peach extract with grass and birch pollen. Methods: The in vivo study was conducted by skin prick tests and open food challenges with fresh fuits in 23 patients with oral allergy syndrome for peach and positive skin prick test and RAST results for the other Prunoideae. In vitro sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was followed by immunoblotting and immunoblotting inhibition. Results: A 13 kd component was identified as the only major allergen common to all the Prunoideae, the other major allergens were found at 14 kd in peach and at 30 kd in cherry. Immunoblotting inhibition showed wide cross-reactivity within the Prunoideae, whereas grass and birch pollen partially inhibited the peach blotting. Conclusions: Clinical cross-reactivity to Prunoideae is essentially due to a common 13 kd IgE-binding component, which seems to be the most important major allergen of this subfamily, not shared with grass and birch pollen.

AB - Background: Oral allergy syndrome in response to fruits and vegetables frequently occurs as clusters of hypersensitivity to members of the same botanical family, for which the immunologic basis lies in a number of common allergens, most of them still unidentified. Objective: This study was designed to assess the in vivo and in vitro cross-reactivity between fruits of the Prunoideae subfamily (i.e., peach, cherry, apricot, and plum) and to identify their major allergens and the cross-reactivity of the peach extract with grass and birch pollen. Methods: The in vivo study was conducted by skin prick tests and open food challenges with fresh fuits in 23 patients with oral allergy syndrome for peach and positive skin prick test and RAST results for the other Prunoideae. In vitro sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was followed by immunoblotting and immunoblotting inhibition. Results: A 13 kd component was identified as the only major allergen common to all the Prunoideae, the other major allergens were found at 14 kd in peach and at 30 kd in cherry. Immunoblotting inhibition showed wide cross-reactivity within the Prunoideae, whereas grass and birch pollen partially inhibited the peach blotting. Conclusions: Clinical cross-reactivity to Prunoideae is essentially due to a common 13 kd IgE-binding component, which seems to be the most important major allergen of this subfamily, not shared with grass and birch pollen.

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