Alloantigen-induced human lymphocytes rendered nonresponsive by a combination of anti-CD80 monoclonal antibodies and cyclosporin-A suppress mixed lymphocyte reaction in vitro

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Abstract

Induction of a state of long-term, alloantigen-specific T cell nonresponsiveness has significant implications for human transplantation. It has been previously described that alloantigen-specific anergy may be induced by addition of cyclosporin-A together with anti-CD80(B7-1) mAb to a MLR. In this study we endeavored to verify whether alloantigen-induced PBL rendered anergic by the addition of a combination of anti-B7 mAb and cyclosporin-A during a MLR had a suppressive effect when added to autologous lymphocytes activated in MLR. We found that: 1) the addition of cells rendered anergic by this procedure to a MLR suppress both proliferative and cytotoxic response of autologous responsive PBL to either the same or third-party stimulator cells; 2) the suppressive effect is limited to alloantigen-induced T cell activation, as addition of anergic cells does not influence mitogen- or antigen-induced proliferation of autologous responsive T cells; 3) nonresponsiveness of suppressed cells cannot be reversed by either subsequent restimulation with allogeneic cells or addition of exogenous IL-2 to the cultures; 4) the suppressive effect is apparently not due to secretion of anergic cell-derived soluble factors, but it seems to be dependent on cell- cell contact between anergic, responsive, and stimulator cells. These data suggest that: 1) the delivery of a direct signal mediated by anergic lymphocytes through a cell-cell contact is likely to be the mechanism responsible for the suppressive effect here described; 2) anergic cells may propagate alloantigen-specific tolerance to potentially responsive autologous lymphocytes. Preliminary experiments indicate that anti-CD86 (B7-2) mAb may play a similar role in the generation of alloantigen-induced nonresponsiveness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5506-5511
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume155
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - 1995

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Mixed Lymphocyte Culture Test
Isoantigens
Cyclosporine
Monoclonal Antibodies
Lymphocytes
T-Lymphocytes
In Vitro Techniques
Mitogens
Interleukin-2
Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

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title = "Alloantigen-induced human lymphocytes rendered nonresponsive by a combination of anti-CD80 monoclonal antibodies and cyclosporin-A suppress mixed lymphocyte reaction in vitro",
abstract = "Induction of a state of long-term, alloantigen-specific T cell nonresponsiveness has significant implications for human transplantation. It has been previously described that alloantigen-specific anergy may be induced by addition of cyclosporin-A together with anti-CD80(B7-1) mAb to a MLR. In this study we endeavored to verify whether alloantigen-induced PBL rendered anergic by the addition of a combination of anti-B7 mAb and cyclosporin-A during a MLR had a suppressive effect when added to autologous lymphocytes activated in MLR. We found that: 1) the addition of cells rendered anergic by this procedure to a MLR suppress both proliferative and cytotoxic response of autologous responsive PBL to either the same or third-party stimulator cells; 2) the suppressive effect is limited to alloantigen-induced T cell activation, as addition of anergic cells does not influence mitogen- or antigen-induced proliferation of autologous responsive T cells; 3) nonresponsiveness of suppressed cells cannot be reversed by either subsequent restimulation with allogeneic cells or addition of exogenous IL-2 to the cultures; 4) the suppressive effect is apparently not due to secretion of anergic cell-derived soluble factors, but it seems to be dependent on cell- cell contact between anergic, responsive, and stimulator cells. These data suggest that: 1) the delivery of a direct signal mediated by anergic lymphocytes through a cell-cell contact is likely to be the mechanism responsible for the suppressive effect here described; 2) anergic cells may propagate alloantigen-specific tolerance to potentially responsive autologous lymphocytes. Preliminary experiments indicate that anti-CD86 (B7-2) mAb may play a similar role in the generation of alloantigen-induced nonresponsiveness.",
author = "P. Comoli and D. Montagna and A. Moretta and M. Zecca and F. Locatelli and R. Maccario",
year = "1995",
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T1 - Alloantigen-induced human lymphocytes rendered nonresponsive by a combination of anti-CD80 monoclonal antibodies and cyclosporin-A suppress mixed lymphocyte reaction in vitro

AU - Comoli, P.

AU - Montagna, D.

AU - Moretta, A.

AU - Zecca, M.

AU - Locatelli, F.

AU - Maccario, R.

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - Induction of a state of long-term, alloantigen-specific T cell nonresponsiveness has significant implications for human transplantation. It has been previously described that alloantigen-specific anergy may be induced by addition of cyclosporin-A together with anti-CD80(B7-1) mAb to a MLR. In this study we endeavored to verify whether alloantigen-induced PBL rendered anergic by the addition of a combination of anti-B7 mAb and cyclosporin-A during a MLR had a suppressive effect when added to autologous lymphocytes activated in MLR. We found that: 1) the addition of cells rendered anergic by this procedure to a MLR suppress both proliferative and cytotoxic response of autologous responsive PBL to either the same or third-party stimulator cells; 2) the suppressive effect is limited to alloantigen-induced T cell activation, as addition of anergic cells does not influence mitogen- or antigen-induced proliferation of autologous responsive T cells; 3) nonresponsiveness of suppressed cells cannot be reversed by either subsequent restimulation with allogeneic cells or addition of exogenous IL-2 to the cultures; 4) the suppressive effect is apparently not due to secretion of anergic cell-derived soluble factors, but it seems to be dependent on cell- cell contact between anergic, responsive, and stimulator cells. These data suggest that: 1) the delivery of a direct signal mediated by anergic lymphocytes through a cell-cell contact is likely to be the mechanism responsible for the suppressive effect here described; 2) anergic cells may propagate alloantigen-specific tolerance to potentially responsive autologous lymphocytes. Preliminary experiments indicate that anti-CD86 (B7-2) mAb may play a similar role in the generation of alloantigen-induced nonresponsiveness.

AB - Induction of a state of long-term, alloantigen-specific T cell nonresponsiveness has significant implications for human transplantation. It has been previously described that alloantigen-specific anergy may be induced by addition of cyclosporin-A together with anti-CD80(B7-1) mAb to a MLR. In this study we endeavored to verify whether alloantigen-induced PBL rendered anergic by the addition of a combination of anti-B7 mAb and cyclosporin-A during a MLR had a suppressive effect when added to autologous lymphocytes activated in MLR. We found that: 1) the addition of cells rendered anergic by this procedure to a MLR suppress both proliferative and cytotoxic response of autologous responsive PBL to either the same or third-party stimulator cells; 2) the suppressive effect is limited to alloantigen-induced T cell activation, as addition of anergic cells does not influence mitogen- or antigen-induced proliferation of autologous responsive T cells; 3) nonresponsiveness of suppressed cells cannot be reversed by either subsequent restimulation with allogeneic cells or addition of exogenous IL-2 to the cultures; 4) the suppressive effect is apparently not due to secretion of anergic cell-derived soluble factors, but it seems to be dependent on cell- cell contact between anergic, responsive, and stimulator cells. These data suggest that: 1) the delivery of a direct signal mediated by anergic lymphocytes through a cell-cell contact is likely to be the mechanism responsible for the suppressive effect here described; 2) anergic cells may propagate alloantigen-specific tolerance to potentially responsive autologous lymphocytes. Preliminary experiments indicate that anti-CD86 (B7-2) mAb may play a similar role in the generation of alloantigen-induced nonresponsiveness.

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