Allocentric and egocentric manipulations of the sense of self-location in full-body illusions and their relation with the sense of body ownership

Antonella Maselli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Self-location refers to the experience of occupying a given position in the environment. Recent research has addressed the sense of self-location as one of the key components of self-consciousness, together with the experience of owning the physical body (ownership) (Blanke and Metzinger, Trends Cogn Sci 13:7–13 in 2009. doi:10.1016/j.tics.2008.10.003). Experimentally controlled full-body illusions proved to be valuable research tools to study these components and their interaction, and to explore their underlying neural underpinning. The focus of this manuscript is to provide a close look into the nuances of different illusory experiences affecting the sense of self-location and to examine their relation to the concurrent experienced sense of body ownership. On the basis of previous reviewed studies, it is proposed that the sense of self-location may be regarded as the blending of two paralllel representations: the abstract allocentric coding of the position occupied in the environment, mainly associated with visual-perspective, and the egocentric mapping of somatosensory sensations into the external space, mainly associated with peripersonal space. Open questions to be addressed by future research are further addressed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)309-312
Number of pages4
JournalCognitive Processing
Volume16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 29 2015

Keywords

  • Body ownership
  • Multisensory integration
  • Self-location
  • Spatial cognition
  • Visual-perspective

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Artificial Intelligence

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Allocentric and egocentric manipulations of the sense of self-location in full-body illusions and their relation with the sense of body ownership'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this