Alterations of source and connectivity EEG patterns under simulated deep-SEA condition

S. F. Storti, E. Formaggio, M. Melucci, F. Faralli, L. Ricciardi, G. Menegaz, L. Pastena

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

New wireless technologies can overcome technical and safety problems of older ones for recording biological signals in hyperbaric chamber. In an application of a Bluetooth system, we measured the electroencephalographic (EEG) activity in professional divers in a hyperbaric chamber to determine how oxygen affects the brain activity. The cortical sources and the connectivity of the EEG rhythms were estimated in three conditions: breathing air at sea level; breathing O2 at a simulated depth of 18 msw; breathing air at sea level after decompression. The oxygen condition was characterized by an amplitude increase in the alpha and beta sources in the parietal and occipital areas and decrease in the occipital delta and theta sources for at least 20 mins, with a parallel disconnection of the frontal-parietal links in the early minutes of O2 breathing. These results may be relevant for establishing a reference point in future studies on oxygen-sensitive subjects.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages339-342
Number of pages4
Volume2015-July
ISBN (Print)9781479923748
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 21 2015
Event12th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging, ISBI 2015 - Brooklyn, United States
Duration: Apr 16 2015Apr 19 2015

Other

Other12th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging, ISBI 2015
CountryUnited States
CityBrooklyn
Period4/16/154/19/15

Keywords

  • Bluetooth
  • brain connectivity
  • EEG
  • hyperbaric chamber
  • oxygen toxicity
  • signal processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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