Ambulatory blood pressure is superior to clinic blood pressure in predicting treatment-induced regression of left ventricular hypertrophy

Giuseppe Mancia, Alberto Zanchetti, Enrico Agebiti-Rosei, Giuseppe Benemio, Raffaele De Cesaris, Roberto Fogari, Achille Pessino, Carlo Porcellati, Antonio Salvetti, Bruno Trimarco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: In cross-sectional studies, ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) correlates more closely than clinic BP with the organ damage of hypertension. Whether ABP predicts development or regression of organ damage over time better than clinic BP, however, is unknown. Methods and Results: In 206 essential hypertensive subjects with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), we measured clinic supine BP, 24-hour ABP, and left ventricular mass index (LVMI, echocardiography) before and after 12 months of treatment with lisinopril (20 mg UID) without or with hydrochlorothiazide (12.5 or 25 mg UID). Measurements included random-zero, clinic orthostatic, and home BP. In all, 184 subjects completed the 12-month treatment period. Before treatment, clinic supine BP was 165±15/105±5 mm Hg (systolic/diastolic), 24-hour average BP was 149±16/95±11 mm Hg, and LVMI was 158±32 g/m2. At the end of treatment, they were 139±12/87±7 mmHg, 131±12/83±10 mmHg, and 133±26 g/m2, respectively (P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1464-1470
Number of pages7
JournalCirculation
Volume95
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 1997

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Left Ventricular Hypertrophy
Blood Pressure
Lisinopril
Hydrochlorothiazide
Echocardiography
Cross-Sectional Studies
Hypertension

Keywords

  • blood pressure
  • circadian rhythm
  • hypertension
  • hypertrophy
  • sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Mancia, G., Zanchetti, A., Agebiti-Rosei, E., Benemio, G., De Cesaris, R., Fogari, R., ... Trimarco, B. (1997). Ambulatory blood pressure is superior to clinic blood pressure in predicting treatment-induced regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. Circulation, 95(6), 1464-1470.

Ambulatory blood pressure is superior to clinic blood pressure in predicting treatment-induced regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. / Mancia, Giuseppe; Zanchetti, Alberto; Agebiti-Rosei, Enrico; Benemio, Giuseppe; De Cesaris, Raffaele; Fogari, Roberto; Pessino, Achille; Porcellati, Carlo; Salvetti, Antonio; Trimarco, Bruno.

In: Circulation, Vol. 95, No. 6, 1997, p. 1464-1470.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mancia, G, Zanchetti, A, Agebiti-Rosei, E, Benemio, G, De Cesaris, R, Fogari, R, Pessino, A, Porcellati, C, Salvetti, A & Trimarco, B 1997, 'Ambulatory blood pressure is superior to clinic blood pressure in predicting treatment-induced regression of left ventricular hypertrophy', Circulation, vol. 95, no. 6, pp. 1464-1470.
Mancia G, Zanchetti A, Agebiti-Rosei E, Benemio G, De Cesaris R, Fogari R et al. Ambulatory blood pressure is superior to clinic blood pressure in predicting treatment-induced regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. Circulation. 1997;95(6):1464-1470.
Mancia, Giuseppe ; Zanchetti, Alberto ; Agebiti-Rosei, Enrico ; Benemio, Giuseppe ; De Cesaris, Raffaele ; Fogari, Roberto ; Pessino, Achille ; Porcellati, Carlo ; Salvetti, Antonio ; Trimarco, Bruno. / Ambulatory blood pressure is superior to clinic blood pressure in predicting treatment-induced regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. In: Circulation. 1997 ; Vol. 95, No. 6. pp. 1464-1470.
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