Amines protect in vitro the celiac small intestine from the damaging activity of gliadin peptides

Salvatore Auricchio, Giorgio de Ritis, Massimo de Vincenzi, Vittorio Gentile, Luigi Maiuri, Elena Mancini, Raffaele Porta, Valeria Raia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Proteins and peptides responsible for the celiac small intestinal lesion inhibit both the enterocyte recovery of in vitro cultured flat celiac mucosa and the in vitro development of fetal rat intestine. They also agglutinate K 562 (S) cells. Using these three in vitro systems (cultured human celiac and rat fetal intestine and cell agglutination), it is shown that several small-molecular-weight amines, mostly the polyamines spermidine and spermine, prevent and reverse K 562 (S) cell agglutination induced by gliadin peptides, whereas they do not prevent cell agglutination induced by concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin. Some of these amines also protected in vitro developing fetal rat intestine and flat celiac mucosa from the damaging effect of gliadin peptides. This protective effect may be related to the trophic activity exerted by amines on the intestine and/or the effect of amines on the functions of intestinal brush border or intracellular membranes involved in the intestinal handling of gliadins.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1668-1674
Number of pages7
JournalGastroenterology
Volume99
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 1990

Fingerprint

Gliadin
Abdomen
Small Intestine
Intestines
Amines
Agglutination
Peptides
Mucous Membrane
Intracellular Membranes
Wheat Germ Agglutinins
Spermidine
Spermine
Enterocytes
Polyamines
Concanavalin A
Microvilli
Fetal Development
Molecular Weight
In Vitro Techniques
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Auricchio, S., de Ritis, G., de Vincenzi, M., Gentile, V., Maiuri, L., Mancini, E., ... Raia, V. (1990). Amines protect in vitro the celiac small intestine from the damaging activity of gliadin peptides. Gastroenterology, 99(6), 1668-1674.

Amines protect in vitro the celiac small intestine from the damaging activity of gliadin peptides. / Auricchio, Salvatore; de Ritis, Giorgio; de Vincenzi, Massimo; Gentile, Vittorio; Maiuri, Luigi; Mancini, Elena; Porta, Raffaele; Raia, Valeria.

In: Gastroenterology, Vol. 99, No. 6, 1990, p. 1668-1674.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Auricchio, S, de Ritis, G, de Vincenzi, M, Gentile, V, Maiuri, L, Mancini, E, Porta, R & Raia, V 1990, 'Amines protect in vitro the celiac small intestine from the damaging activity of gliadin peptides', Gastroenterology, vol. 99, no. 6, pp. 1668-1674.
Auricchio S, de Ritis G, de Vincenzi M, Gentile V, Maiuri L, Mancini E et al. Amines protect in vitro the celiac small intestine from the damaging activity of gliadin peptides. Gastroenterology. 1990;99(6):1668-1674.
Auricchio, Salvatore ; de Ritis, Giorgio ; de Vincenzi, Massimo ; Gentile, Vittorio ; Maiuri, Luigi ; Mancini, Elena ; Porta, Raffaele ; Raia, Valeria. / Amines protect in vitro the celiac small intestine from the damaging activity of gliadin peptides. In: Gastroenterology. 1990 ; Vol. 99, No. 6. pp. 1668-1674.
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AB - Proteins and peptides responsible for the celiac small intestinal lesion inhibit both the enterocyte recovery of in vitro cultured flat celiac mucosa and the in vitro development of fetal rat intestine. They also agglutinate K 562 (S) cells. Using these three in vitro systems (cultured human celiac and rat fetal intestine and cell agglutination), it is shown that several small-molecular-weight amines, mostly the polyamines spermidine and spermine, prevent and reverse K 562 (S) cell agglutination induced by gliadin peptides, whereas they do not prevent cell agglutination induced by concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin. Some of these amines also protected in vitro developing fetal rat intestine and flat celiac mucosa from the damaging effect of gliadin peptides. This protective effect may be related to the trophic activity exerted by amines on the intestine and/or the effect of amines on the functions of intestinal brush border or intracellular membranes involved in the intestinal handling of gliadins.

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