An electronic device for artefact suppression in human local field potential recordings during deep brain stimulation

L. Rossi, G. Foffani, S. Marceglia, F. Bracchi, S. Barbieri, A. Priori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The clinical efficacy of high-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's disease and other neuropsychiatric disorders likely depends on the modulation of neuronal rhythms in the target nuclei. This modulation could be effectively measured with local field potential (LFP) recordings during DBS. However, a technical drawback that prevents LFPs from being recorded from the DBS target nuclei during stimulation is the stimulus artefact. To solve this problem, we designed and developed 'FilterDBS', an electronic amplification system for artefact-free LFP recordings (in the frequency range 2-40 Hz) during DBS. After defining the estimated system requirements for LFP amplification and DBS artefact suppression, we tested the FilterDBS system by conducting experiments in vitro and in vivo in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease undergoing DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Under both experimental conditions, in vitro and in vivo, the FilterDBS system completely suppressed the DBS artefact without inducing significant spectral distortion. The FilterDBS device pioneers the development of an adaptive DBS system retroacted by LFPs and can be used in novel closed-loop brain-machine interface applications in patients with neurological disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Article number010
Pages (from-to)96-106
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neural Engineering
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2007

Fingerprint

Deep Brain Stimulation
Artifacts
Brain
Equipment and Supplies
Parkinson Disease
Amplification
Brain-Computer Interfaces
Modulation
Subthalamic Nucleus
Nervous System Diseases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)

Cite this

An electronic device for artefact suppression in human local field potential recordings during deep brain stimulation. / Rossi, L.; Foffani, G.; Marceglia, S.; Bracchi, F.; Barbieri, S.; Priori, A.

In: Journal of Neural Engineering, Vol. 4, No. 2, 010, 01.06.2007, p. 96-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rossi, L. ; Foffani, G. ; Marceglia, S. ; Bracchi, F. ; Barbieri, S. ; Priori, A. / An electronic device for artefact suppression in human local field potential recordings during deep brain stimulation. In: Journal of Neural Engineering. 2007 ; Vol. 4, No. 2. pp. 96-106.
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