An epidemic of gastroenteritis and mild necrotizing enterocolitis in two neonatal units of a University Hospital in Rome, Italy

A. Faustini, F. Forastiere, P. Giorgi Rossi, C. A. Perucci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the summer of 1999 a cluster of 18 cases of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) occurred in a University Hospital in Rome, Italy. The cases presented with mild clinical and radiological signs, and none died. Seventy-two per cent had a birth weight of >2500 g, 66.7% had a gestational age of >37 weeks, 30% presented with respiratory diseases and/or hypoglycaemia. All cases occurred within 10 days of birth and between 5 and 7 days after two clusters of diarrhoea (14 cases). The NEC outbreak had two phases; most cases in the first phase occurred in the at-risk unit, whereas those in the second phase occurred in the full-term unit. In the multivariate analysis, invasive therapeutic procedures, pathological conditions and formula feeding were associated with NEC. Although no predominant common bacteria were isolated, we suggest an infective origin of this outbreak.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)455-465
Number of pages11
JournalEpidemiology and Infection
Volume132
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2004

Fingerprint

Necrotizing Enterocolitis
Gastroenteritis
Italy
Disease Outbreaks
Hypoglycemia
Birth Weight
Gestational Age
Diarrhea
Multivariate Analysis
Parturition
Bacteria
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

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An epidemic of gastroenteritis and mild necrotizing enterocolitis in two neonatal units of a University Hospital in Rome, Italy. / Faustini, A.; Forastiere, F.; Rossi, P. Giorgi; Perucci, C. A.

In: Epidemiology and Infection, Vol. 132, No. 3, 06.2004, p. 455-465.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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