An experimental model to reproduce some bacterial intestinal cocultures in germ-free mice

M. R. Gismondo, L. Drago, A. Lombardi, C. Fassina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this study was to create a stable experimental model to act as a living incubator for the main important intestinal bacteria. We have therefore inoculated germ-free mice with the most important bacteria of the human intestinal microflora, in order to study the effect of some oral antibiotics on the intestinal microflora. Sixty germ-free mice, 7 weeks old and of either sex, were inoculated orally with human faecal bacteria by means of their drinking water. Administrations were made at regular intervals following a scheme that respected some of the metabolic inter-relationships of the microorganisms used. The results showed that colonization of the germ-free mouse intestines had been achieved by most of the bacteria that had been inoculated. This 'coculture' was stable in time, contrary to what happens when in-toto lyophilized faeces are administered, and the bacterial concentrations for each strains were similar to those found in human faeces.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)149-152
Number of pages4
JournalDrugs under Experimental and Clinical Research
Volume20
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1994

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Coculture Techniques
Theoretical Models
Bacteria
Feces
Incubators
Drinking Water
Intestines
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Gastrointestinal Microbiome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Drug Discovery
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

An experimental model to reproduce some bacterial intestinal cocultures in germ-free mice. / Gismondo, M. R.; Drago, L.; Lombardi, A.; Fassina, C.

In: Drugs under Experimental and Clinical Research, Vol. 20, No. 4, 1994, p. 149-152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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