An Increase of Abdominal Pressure Increases Pulmonary Edema in Oleic Acid-induced Lung Injury

Michael Quintel, Paolo Pelosi, Pietro Caironi, Jurgen Peter Meinhardt, Thomas Luecke, Peter Herrmann, Paolo Taccone, Christian Rylander, Franco Valenza, Eleonora Carlesso, Luciano Gattinoni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Increased abdominal pressure is common in intensive care unit patients. To investigate its impact on respiration and hemodynamics we applied intraabdominal pressure (alAP) of 0 and 20 cm H2O (pneumoperitoneum) in seven pigs. The whole-lung computed tomography scan and a complete set of respiratory and hemodynamics variables were recorded both in healthy lung and after oleic acid (OA) injury. In healthy lung, alAP 20 cm H2O significantly lowered the gas content, leaving the tissue content unchanged. In OA-injured lung at alAP 0 cm H2O, the gas content significantly decreased compared with healthy lung. The excess tissue mass (edema) amounted to 30 ± 24% of the original tissue weight (455 ± 80 g). The edema was primarily distributed in the base regions and was not gravity dependent. Heart volume, central venous, pulmonary artery, wedge, and systemic arterial pressures significantly increased. At alAP 20 cm H2O in OA-injured lung, the central venous and pulmonary artery pressures further increased. The gas content further decreased, and the excess tissue mass rose up to 103 ± 37% (tissue weight 905 ± 134 g), with homogeneous distribution along the cephalocaudal and sternovertebral axis. We conclude that in OA-injured lung, the increase of IAP increases the amount of edema.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)534-541
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume169
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Feb 15 2004

Fingerprint

Lung Injury
Pulmonary Edema
Oleic Acid
Pressure
Lung
Edema
Gases
Pulmonary Artery
Hemodynamics
Weights and Measures
Cardiac Volume
Pneumoperitoneum
Gravitation
Intensive Care Units
Arterial Pressure
Respiration
Swine
Tomography
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome
  • Computed tomography scan
  • Intraabdominal pressure
  • Lung mechanics
  • Pulmonary edema

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Quintel, M., Pelosi, P., Caironi, P., Meinhardt, J. P., Luecke, T., Herrmann, P., ... Gattinoni, L. (2004). An Increase of Abdominal Pressure Increases Pulmonary Edema in Oleic Acid-induced Lung Injury. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 169(4), 534-541.

An Increase of Abdominal Pressure Increases Pulmonary Edema in Oleic Acid-induced Lung Injury. / Quintel, Michael; Pelosi, Paolo; Caironi, Pietro; Meinhardt, Jurgen Peter; Luecke, Thomas; Herrmann, Peter; Taccone, Paolo; Rylander, Christian; Valenza, Franco; Carlesso, Eleonora; Gattinoni, Luciano.

In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 169, No. 4, 15.02.2004, p. 534-541.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Quintel, M, Pelosi, P, Caironi, P, Meinhardt, JP, Luecke, T, Herrmann, P, Taccone, P, Rylander, C, Valenza, F, Carlesso, E & Gattinoni, L 2004, 'An Increase of Abdominal Pressure Increases Pulmonary Edema in Oleic Acid-induced Lung Injury', American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 169, no. 4, pp. 534-541.
Quintel M, Pelosi P, Caironi P, Meinhardt JP, Luecke T, Herrmann P et al. An Increase of Abdominal Pressure Increases Pulmonary Edema in Oleic Acid-induced Lung Injury. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 2004 Feb 15;169(4):534-541.
Quintel, Michael ; Pelosi, Paolo ; Caironi, Pietro ; Meinhardt, Jurgen Peter ; Luecke, Thomas ; Herrmann, Peter ; Taccone, Paolo ; Rylander, Christian ; Valenza, Franco ; Carlesso, Eleonora ; Gattinoni, Luciano. / An Increase of Abdominal Pressure Increases Pulmonary Edema in Oleic Acid-induced Lung Injury. In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 2004 ; Vol. 169, No. 4. pp. 534-541.
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