An instrumented glove for small primates

Simon A. Overduin, Farah Zaheer, Emilio Bizzi, Andrea d'Avella

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Cymanus is a novel flex sensor glove for measuring hand kinematics in primates. It was used to monitor 9 joints of a rhesus macaque performing a grasping task with 25 objects. Over 6 days, the monkey tolerated the glove and showed no significant impairment in performance. The sensors linearly tracked joint angles, with joint trajectories preserved over days. Angular positions discriminated objects as accurately as electromyograms recorded simultaneously from 24 arm and hand muscles, and were maximally informative of object identity at the end of reach-to-grasp. In a further validation of the glove, muscle activity controlling a joint was correlated with the joint's angular acceleration 70 ms later.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-104
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Methods
Volume187
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2010

Fingerprint

Primates
Joints
Hand
Muscles
Electromyography
Hand Strength
Macaca mulatta
Biomechanical Phenomena
Haplorhini
Arm

Keywords

  • Finger
  • Grasping
  • Hand
  • Kinematics
  • Monkey
  • Motor
  • Muscle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

An instrumented glove for small primates. / Overduin, Simon A.; Zaheer, Farah; Bizzi, Emilio; d'Avella, Andrea.

In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods, Vol. 187, No. 1, 03.2010, p. 100-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Overduin, Simon A. ; Zaheer, Farah ; Bizzi, Emilio ; d'Avella, Andrea. / An instrumented glove for small primates. In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods. 2010 ; Vol. 187, No. 1. pp. 100-104.
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