An interactive tool for customizing clinical Transacranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) experiments

A. Faro, D. Giordano, I. Kavasidis, C. Pino, C. Spampinato, M. G. Cantone, G. Lanza, M. Pennisi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a very useful technique for neurophysiological and neuropsychological investigations. In this paper we propose a user-friendly and a fully customizable system that allows experimental control, data recording for all the currently used TMS paradigms (single and paired pulse TMS). This system consists of two parts: 1) a user-interface that allows the medical doctors to customize the settings of their experiments and to include post-processing and statistical tools for analyzing the acquired patients data, and 2) a hardware-interface that communicates with the existing TMS equipment. New algorithms for post-processing and new user settings can be easily added without interfering with the hardware part communication. The proposed system was used for conducting a clinical experiment for estimating patterns of cortical excitability in patients with geriatric depression and subcortical ischemic vascular disease, achieving very interesting results from the medical point of view.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIFMBE Proceedings
Pages200-203
Number of pages4
Volume29
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Event12th Mediterranean Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, MEDICON 2010 - Chalkidiki, Greece
Duration: May 27 2010May 30 2010

Other

Other12th Mediterranean Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, MEDICON 2010
CountryGreece
CityChalkidiki
Period5/27/105/30/10

Keywords

  • Geriatric Depression
  • Motor Cortex
  • Subcortical Ischemic Vascular Disease
  • TMS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Bioengineering

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