An outbreak of chickenpox in an asylum seeker centre in Italy: Outbreak investigation and validity of reported chickenpox history, December 2015– May 2016

Francesco Vairo, Virginia Di Bari, Vincenzo Panella, Giuseppe Quintavalle, Saul Torchia, Maria Cristina Serra, Maria Teresa Sinopoli, Maurizio Lopalco, Giancarlo Ceccarelli, Federica Ferraro, Sabrina Valle, Licia Bordi, Maria Rosaria Capobianchi, Vincenzo Puro, Paola Scognamiglio, Giuseppe Ippolito, Keh Buma Dinga Charles, Valeria Tognoni, Mariarosaria Cuomo, Giada BellancaSerena Vita, Ida Walters, Veronica Di Renzo, Irene Conti Papuzza, Maria Leonardi, Elsa Dimitrova, Mihaela Bujor, Monica Sane-Schepisi, Simone Lanini, Roberto Leone, Alessandro Agresta, Carla Nisii, Eleonora Lalle, Luisa Felici, Isabella Abate, Outbreak Investigation Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

An outbreak of chickenpox occurred between December 2015 and May 2016 among asylum seekers in a reception centre in Latium, Italy. We describe the epidemiological and laboratory investigations, control measures and validity of reported history of chickenpox infection. Serological screening of all residents and incoming asylum seekers was performed, followed by vaccine offer to all susceptible individuals without contraindication. Forty-six cases were found and 41 were associated with the outbreak. No complications, hospitalisations or deaths occurred. Serological testing was performed in 1,278 individuals and 169 were found to be susceptible, with a seroprevalence of 86.8%. A questionnaire was administered to 336 individuals consecutively attending the CARA health post to collect their serological result. The sensitivity, specificity and the positive and negative predictive value (PPV and NPV) of the reported history of chickenpox were 45.0%, 76.1%, 88.3% and 25.6%, respectively. We observed an increasing trend for the PPV and decreasing trend for the NPV with increasing age. Our report confirms that, in the asylum seeker population, chickenpox history is not the optimal method to identify susceptible individuals. Our experience supports the need for additional prevention and control measures and highlights the importance of national and local surveillance systems for reception centres.

Original languageEnglish
Article number17-00020
JournalEurosurveillance
Volume22
Issue number46
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 16 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Virology

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